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NATIVE KENTUCKY BALLADS / 001
Arch and Gordon

clippings transcribed by Steve Green


Frankfort Roundabout (KY) ~ April 23, 1887

Miss Nellie Bush, formerly of this city, sister of Mrs. Geo. F. Berry, and Mr. Fulton Gordon, clerk at the Galt House, Louisville, were married Saturday in Jeffersonville, Indiana.


New York Sun (NY) ~ April 24, 1887

CUPID IN KENTUCKY.

Three Elopements in One Day, with the Usual Romantic Incidents.

From the Louisville Courier-Journal.

Yesterday afternoon Mr. Fulton Gordon and Miss Nellie W. Bush betook themselves quietly and unattended to Jeffersonville, where they were married by the Rev. J. W. Hutchins at the residence of the latter. The affair was conducted with so much secrecy that it was very late last night when a rumor was run down and the truth learned. Both Mr. Gordon and Miss Bush, that was, are among the best known young people in Louisville. Their friends and acquaintances would scarcely have been astonished by the announcement of their betrothal, for Mr. Gordon has been paying the most devoted attention to the young lady for many months. An elopement, however, was hardly reckoned upon, and the romantic crisis in their relations comes as a genuine surprise. The young lady has only been in society a short time, but long enough to become known as one of its brightest and most charming members. She is a decided blonde, with large blue eyes, and is especially noted for her vivacious manners and pleasing conversational powers.


Frankfort Roundabout (KY) ~ February 21, 1891

Mrs. Fulton Gordon is the guest of her mother, Mrs. Cornelia Bush, in Louisville.


Frankfort Roundabout (KY) ~ June 27, 1891

Mrs. Fulton Gordon, of Louisville, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Geo. Berry.


Frankfort Roundabout (KY) ~ April 30, 1892

Mrs. Fulton Gordon and daughter, little Miss Cornelia, arrived Wednesday from Chicago to visit her sister, Mrs. Geo. Berry.


Frankfort Roundabout (KY) ~ September 17, 1892

Mrs. Sam Bush, of Louisville, who has been the guest of Mrs. George F. Berry and Mrs. Cornelia Bush, of this city, left Monday for Chicago where she will visit Mrs. Fulton Gordon.


Frankfort Roundabout (KY) ~ October 29, 1892

Mrs. Cornelia Bush has returned from Chicago after a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Fulton Gordon.


Frankfort Roundabout (KY) ~ June 24, 1893

Mrs. Geo. F. Berry is visiting her sister, Mrs. Fulton Gordon, of Chicago.


Frankfort Roundabout (KY) ~ October 20, 1894

Mrs. Fulton Gordon, of Chicago, is visiting her sister, Mrs. George Berry.


Frankfort Roundabout (KY) ~ April 6, 1895

Mrs. Fulton Gordon, of Chicago, is visiting her sister, Mrs. George F. Berry, on Shelby street.


Breckenridge News (Cloverport, KY) ~ May 1, 1895

DOUBLE TRAGEDY.

Arch Brown, The Governor's Son Shot to Death by Fulton Gordon.

Mrs. Gordon Killed by Her Infuriated Husband While Trying to Escape.

A startling double tragedy occurred in Louisville yesterday afternoon that puts another blot upon the fair name of Kentucky. Fulton Gordon shot to death Archie Brown, the son of Governor John Y. Brown, of Frankfort. Gordon also killed his wife while she tried to make her escape. The News gets no particulars of the awful double tragedy, but from what we could learn over the wires, it seems that young Brown and Mrs. Gordon were found together at a disreputable place in the city, the infuriated husband coming upon them shot Brown first and then his wife while she tried to make her escape. The parties are all well known in Louisville, and the greatest excitement prevailed there yesterday afternoon over the affair. Gordon is in jail. He formerly clerked at the Galt House. Archie Brown was the Governor's private Secretary, and affairs about his own household heretofore, it is said, have not been of the best.


Fort Worth Gazette (TX) ~ May 1, 1895

THE WAGES OF SIN IS DEATH

DEATH TO THE BODY, TO REPUTATION AND TO CHARACTER.

KENTUCKY CONVULSED BY A DOUBLE TRAGEDY INVOLVING THE UPPER TEN.

FULTON GORDON FINDS HIS WIFE IN FLAGRANT DELICTU WITH THE SON OF GOVERNOR BROWN—HE SLAYS THE MAN FIRST AND THEN THE GUILTY WIFE.

Louisville, April 30. At separate undertaking establishments in this city lie the bodies of two of perhaps the most prominent people in the state of Kentucky. One is of Arch D. Brown, son and private secretary of Kentucky's chief executive; the other that of Mrs. Fulton Gordon, prominent because of her remarkable beauty and excellent family connections.

The story is a sad one and has caused one of the greatest sensations this city or state has ever been called upon to chronicle.
The following telegram found in Mr. Brown's pocket, no doubt is the direct cause of the double murder:

"Louisville, Ky., April 28 — Archie D. Brown, governor's private secretary, Frankfort, Ky.: Don't write any more. Come Tuesday. Meet me at S., 10 a.m. —"P.M."

Upon receipt of the above telegram Mr. Brown came to Louisville and proceeded to the appointed place, which is an evil resort at 1025 Madison street, where at 12.35 o'clock today the tragedy occurred.

At noon, Brown with Gordon's wife, knocked at the front door of Lucy B. Smith's Madison street house. They were admitted by Mattie Mattingly, a colored woman, and immediately repaired to the upstairs front room, which had been previously engaged. Thirty minutes later a rather tall, dark-haired man knocked at the door of the house and was admitted. This was Fulton Gordon, and he engaged the front lower room, saying that a woman would join him there. The man closed all the doors, and a few minutes later a commotion was heard above, followed by a succession of pistol shots.

Then there was a hurried movement down stairs as Mrs. Gordon fled from the scene. A few more shots rang out and she fell dead on the porch in the rear yard. Gordon left the house immediately, but a few minutes later Brown's corpse was found in the upstairs room.

Police Officers Reilly and Papaille were standing at Tenth and Walnut at 12;25 when some negro boys came along and told them there had been a murder at Lucy Smith's house. The policemen rushed down Walnut street and saw a man running for a buggy tied to a post at the corner of West street.

"The man was bloody," said Officer Reilly, "and I immediately jumped at the conclusion that he was the murderer. I ran and grabbed him just as he was in the act of jumping into the buggy. He had already untied the horse when I arrived.

"Gordon, for such he turned out to be, said to me: 'I shot both of them. I caught them in the act. They are both dead. I am shot too. Come with me and I'll show you where they are.'"

"Gordon was as pale as a ghost. Lapaille, myself and Gordon walked to Lucy Smith's house. Just as we got inside the front door Gordon staggered and was about to fall, when I caught him. He was in a fainting condition and I dashed some water in his face.

"I summoned the ambulance, and as soon as that arrived we sent Gordon to jail."

Lapaille said he had known Mrs. Gordon by reputation for some time. She had been going by the name of Reese.

Never was there a more sanguinary battle than the one fought in the front room of the second floor of Lucy Smith's house. Gordon had little difficulty in getting into the room, as the fact that there are no broken locks indicates that the entry way was left unlatched. As soon as Gordon gained egress a desperate duel was evidently begun. Brown had a .38 caliber revolver which was found empty after the tragedy.

Gordon must have had two pistols, as six bullets pierced Brown's body, and three that of Mrs. Gordon. The bed on which Brown and Mrs. Gordon lay was covered with blood, showing that one or both had been shot while in that position, or in the struggle one or more of the wounded had fallen there.

Gordon himself was covered with blood, most of which was doubtless caused by contact with his wounded antagonist. Just what part, if any, Mrs. Gordon took in the desperate encounter, only her husband is [in] a position to say. Two bullets are imbedded in the door, several went through a window which faced north; three were buried in the walls and two in the ceiling. The walls all around the room are smeared with blood. The dingy carpet is saturated with gore, and the furniture was badly broken in the fray.

Brown's body presented a horrible appearance, being covered with blood from head to foot. There were no clothes on the body except a pair of knit drawers and a pair of black socks. The under[shirt] had been removed, and the wounds are plainly visible. There were three wounds in the breast, one of them being over the region of the heart; there were two wounds in the head, one being in the center of the forehead, and there was another in the center of the stomach and another in the right arm. Clotted blood oozed from these wounds, presenting a sickening sight. The features were distorted.

Mrs. Gordon's body was found on the cellar door, face downward, clothed only in a chemise and a skirt, and was in stocking feet. Her hair was loose and was hanging about her head in a tangled mass. Her face was calm, and gave no sign of a struggle. Her bosom was covered with blood and her skirt was bespattered with the fluid. Her hands were tightly clenched and her face was covered with splotches.

Gordon is in jail and no one is allowed to see him. He is unhurt, but is suffering from nervous prostration.

Gordon states that he tried to kill himself after shooting Brown and his wife, but the cartridge failed to explode and his hand was nervous. On his way to jail Gordon stated to the officer he had suspected the couple for some time, and about a week ago his suspicions were confirmed. Ever since he had kept watch on his wife, and today learning that she and Brown were at the house on Madison street, he went there and the tragedy followed.

At 8 o'clock tonight the coroner's jury rendered a verdict of justifiable homicide.

Gordon's case will be tried tomorrow.

Governor Brown, accompanied by Secretary of State Headly, arrived in the city from Frankfort at 9:30 o'clock and is stopping at the Galt house. The governor is completely prostrated by the sad affair.

When seen by a reporter of the Associated Press tonight he stated that he did not care to discuss the matter.

Young Brown's body will be taken to Henderson tomorrow for burial.

The remains of Mrs. Gordon are at Wyatt's undertaking establishment on Seventh street, and young Brown's body is at King's undertaking establishment on Jefferson street.

Mrs. Gordon was Miss Nellie Bush of this city, and her family is one of the best known and most prominent in this state. Her mother was once state librarian at Frankfort, and her grandfather was Judge Zacharia Wheat, chief justice of the court of appeals of Kentucky and one of the most learned and distinguished of Kentucky jurists. Gordon was at one time assistant manager of the Palmer house in Chicago.


New York Times (NY) ~ May 1, 1895

GOV. BROWN’S SON KILLED

Shot By Fulton Gordon, Whom He Had Wronged, in Louisville, Ky.

THE SAME DEATH FOR MRS. GORDON

The Husband Followed the Pair to a Resort—A Terrible Duel in Which Brown Fired Without Effect.

Louisville, Ky., April 30. — Archie Brown, the Governor’s son and Secretary, was shot and killed today for improper conduct with another man’s wife. The wife shared the same fate, the wronged husband—Fulton Gordon—shooting both in the room in which he had surprised them.

The tragedy took place in a resort at 1025 West Madison Street.

Brown, with Gordon’s wife, went to the place at noon. They repaired immediately to a room which had been previously engaged. The husband went to the house thirty minutes later, and was admitted. He also engaged a room.

Within a few minutes a commotion was heard above, followed by a succession of pistol shots. Then Mrs. Gordon came running down the stairs. A few more shots were fired, and she fell dead on the porch in the rear yard.

Gordon left the house immediately. A few moments later Brown’s body was found in the upstairs room. The following telegram was taken from his pocket:

“Louisville, Ky., April 28. Archie D. Brown, Governor’s Private Secretary, Frankfort, Ky.—Don’t write any more. Come Tuesday. Meet me at S., 10 A.M. —P.M.”

It was because of this telegram that Brown met Mrs. Gordon this morning.

It was a short but sanguinary battle that was fought in the room occupied by Brown. As soon as Gordon gained admittance a duel evidently began. Brown had a thirty-eight caliber revolver, which was found empty after the tragedy. Gordon fired with two pistols, six bullets having pierced Brown’s body and three that of Mrs. Gordon.

The slayer of Brown and Mrs. Gordon, when arrested, exclaimed: “I shot both of them! I caught them! They are both dead! Come with me and I’ll show you where they are!”

Gordon said to a policeman that he had suspected the couple for some time, and about a week ago he found that his suspicions were correct. He said he fired five shots at Brown before the Governor’s son had his own pistol in play. Brown fired two shots at Gordon. Then the latter grappled with him, and took his pistol away from him, and shot at him with his own weapon. After shooting at Brown he shot at his wife as she was going down the steps, striking her just as she reached the bottom.

A woman employed in the resort says that Brown and Mrs. Gordon had been accustomed to visit the house on Saturday of each week for some time.

Mrs. Gordon was Miss Nellie Bush of this city. Her family is one of the most prominent in the State. Her mother was once State Librarian, and her grandfather was Judge Zachariah Wheat, Chief Justice of the Court of Appeals of Kentucky.

Fulton Gordon, at the time of his marriage, was one of the best known men about town. He was then clerk at the Galt House of this city, and had acquaintances in every portion of the country. He eloped with Miss Bush about ten years ago. Shortly afterward they moved to Frankfort, where he became proprietor of the Kenyon Hotel. This he continued to run until the World’s Fair began, when he sold out his establishment and moved to Chicago, where he became manager of the Turkish baths in the Palmer House.

The Coroner held an inquest this afternoon, and the jury rendered a verdict of justifiable homicide. It is understood, however, that Gordon will be held for a formal preliminary examination.

The body of Brown will be taken charge of by his father, and will be taken to Henderson, the Governor’s home, for burial.


New York Sun (NY) ~ May 1, 1895

GOV. BROWN'S SON KILLED.

HE AND MRS. GORDON SHOT DEAD BY THE WOMAN'S HUSBAND.

Archibald Brown, Private Secretary and Favorite Son of Kentucky's Chief Executive, and Mrs. Fulton Gordon Found In a Compromising Situation and Both Pay the Penalty With Their Lives—The Husband Exonerated by the Coroner's Jury.

Louisville, April 30. — As a penalty for an unlawful intimacy, Archibald Dixon Brown, son of and private secretary to Gov. Brown, and Mrs. Nellie Bush Gordon were killed in a disorderly house here today. Their slayer was the woman's husband, Fulton Gordon, who found them together. He is now in jail. The high social position of those involved and the circumstances surrounding the tragedy have made it one of the most sensational in the history of the State.

The affair occurred at 12:35 o'clock. At noon Brown and Mrs. Gordon came to the front door of Lucy B. Smith's house in Madison street. They were admitted by Mattie Mattingly, a colored woman, and immediately went to the upstairs front room which had previously been engaged. Thirty minutes later a tall, dark-haired man knocked at the door of the house and was admitted. He engaged the front lower room, saying that a companion would join him there soon. The man closed all the doors, and a few minutes later a commotion was heard above, followed by a succession of pistol shots. Then there was a hurried movement down stairs as Mrs. Gordon fled from the scene. A few more shots rang out, and she fell dead on the porch in the rear yard. The new arrival was Gordon, and he left the house immediately. A few moments later Brown's body was found in the upstairs room.

Brown had come to Louisville in response to a telegram from the woman, and they went directly to the house, where they were frequent visitors. There were no witnesses to the tragedy, but it is evident that as soon as Gordon gained entrance a battle began. Brown had a .38 calibre revolver, which was empty when found after the tragedy. The bed was covered with blood, showing that one or both had been shot while lying there or in the struggle one or more of the wounded had fallen on it. Gordon himself was covered with blood, most of which doubtless was the result of contact with his wounded antagonists.

Just what part, if any, Mrs. Gordon took in the encounter only her husband can say.

Two bullets are embedded in the door, several went through the window which faced to the north, three are buried in the walls, and two in the ceiling. The dingy carpet on the floor is blood-stained, and the furniture was badly broken. An examination of the bodies showed that Brown had been shot six times and Mrs. Gordon three.

Mrs. Gordon was shot with Brown's pistol, with which Gordon also finished Brown, hitting him with two shots. Brown also shot twice at Gordon, but the bullets missed their mark.

Gordon was arrested by Policemen Reilly and Lapaille while getting into his buggy. He exclaimed:

"I shot both of them. I caught them in the act. They are both dead. Come with me and I'll show you where they are."

Gordon said he had been suspecting the couple for some time, and about a week ago found that his suspicions were correct. He went to the house this morning and found the couple together. He drew his pistol and fired five shots at Brown, by which time Brown had his own pistol out. Brown fired two shots, and then Gordon grappled with him and took his pistol away from him and shot at him with his own weapon. After shooting at Brown, Gordon shot at his wife as she was going down the steps, striking her just as she reached the bottom.

The following telegram was taken from Brown's pocket:

Louisville, Ky., April 28. Archie D. Brown, Governor's Private Secretary, Frankfort, Ky.: Don't write anymore. Come Tuesday. Meet me at S., 10 A.M.

The inquest was begun at 4 o'clock this afternoon, and justifiable homicide was the verdict of the Coroner's jury.

Mrs. Gordon was Miss Nellie Bush of this city, and her family is one of the best known in this State. Her mother was once State Librarian at Frankfort, and her grandfather was Judge Zacharias Wheat, Chief Justice of the Court of Appeals of Kentucky and one of the most learned and distinguished of Kentucky jurists. She eloped about eight years ago with Gordon and married him in Jeffersonville. At that time Gordon was well known about town. He was a clerk at the Galt House, and had acquaintances in every part of the country. In the summer of 1890 Gordon left the Galt House to go into business for himself as manager of the Kenyon Hotel Company at Frankfort.

During the Constitutional Convention of 1890 and 1891 Mrs. Gordon attracted a great deal of attention and admiration, and seemed to court the latter at every opportunity. She soon became talked about in an unpleasant way, but her husband was deaf to all stories of alleged indiscretions on his wife's part.

The winter following there was an open scandal that everyone in Frankfort was talking about. This resulted in the Kenyon Hotel Company ousting Gordon from the management of the property and the separation of Gordon and his wife. After this separation Gordon went to Chicago, where he was employed for a long time as a clerk in the Palmer House. About a year ago the husband and wife became reconciled and Gordon returned to Louisville, where he became manager of the Merchants' Advice, a tradesmen's protective organization.

Brown was 26 years old. He was the favorite son of his father, who arrived in Louisville this evening almost prostrated with grief. His wife, Virginia Marshall Brown, secured a divorce a few weeks ago on the grounds of incompatibility of temper, and secured custody of their daughter. Mrs. Gordon joined the College Street Presbyterian Church about three weeks ago.

Frankfort, Ky., April 30. — The news of the tragic death of Archie Dixon Brown reached here by telegraph shortly after 1 o'clock. A telegram from Dr. John Young Brown, Jr., conveyed intelligence to Gov. Brown, who at the time was sitting in his office conversing with Secretary of State Headly and Commissioner of Agriculture McDowell. He was completely overcome when he learned of the tragic fate of his son, to whom he was devoted. The Governor's grief was uncontrollable, and he gave way to frequent lamentations. He and Secretary Headly left at 3 o'clock for Louisville.

[The Omaha story below closely mirrors the story appearing in the Fort Worth Gazette on the same day, but some of the lurid descriptive details of the murder have been toned down or edited out. —SG]


Omaha Daily Bee (NE) ~ May 1, 1895

TWO PERSONS FATALLY SHOT

Outraged Husband Kills His Wife and Companion and is Shot Himself.

GENUINE KENTUCKY SENSATION

The Persons Killed Two of the Most Prominent People—Gordon, the Murderer, in Jail—Confessed His Crime and the Reason Why He Shot Them.

Louisville, Ky., April 30. — At separate undertaking establishments in this city lie the bodies of perhaps two of the most prominent people in the state of Kentucky, one that of Archie Brown, son and private secretary to Kentucky's chief magistrate, the other that of Mrs. Fulton Gordon, prominent because of her remarkable beauty and excellent family connections. The story is a sad one and has caused one of the greatest sensations this city or state has ever been called on to chronicle.

The following telegram found in Mr. Brown’s pocket no doubt is the direct cause of the double murder:

Louisville, Ky., April 28. — Archie D. Brown, Governor’s Private Secretary, Frankfort, Ky.: Don’t write any more. Come Tuesday. Meet me at S. P.M.C.

Upon receipt of the above telegram Mr. Brown came to Louisville and proceeded to the appointed place which is an evil resort at 1025 Madison street, where, at 12:35 today, the tragedy occurred. At noon Brown, with Gordon’s wife, knocked at the front door of Lucie B. Smith’s Madison street house. They were admitted by Mattie Mattingly, a colored woman, and immediately repaired to the upstairs front room, which had been previously engaged. Thirty minutes later a rather tall, dark haired man knocked at the door of the house and was admitted. This was Fulton Gordon. He engaged the front lower room, saying a woman would join him shortly. The man closed all the doors and a few minutes later a commotion was heard above, followed by a succession of pistol shots. There was a hurried movement down stairs as Mrs. Gordon fled from the scene. A few more shots rang out and she fell dead on the porch in the rear yard. Gordon left the house immediately, and a few minutes later Brown’s corpse was found in the upstairs room. Policemen Reilly and Lapaille rushed down Walnut street and saw a man running for a buggy tied to a post at the corner of West street.

“The man was bloody,” said Officer Reilly, “and I immediately jumped to the conclusion that he was the murderer. I ran and grabbed him just as he was in the act of jumping into the buggy. He had already untied the horse when I arrived.

“Gordon, for it was he, said to me then: ‘I shot both of them. I caught them in the act. They are both dead. I am shot, too. Come with me and I’ll show you where they are.”

Gordon was as pale as a ghost, and was evidently very weak. Lapaille, myself and Gordon walked to the house. Just as we got inside the door Gordon staggered and was about to fall when I caught him. He was in a fainting condition, and somebody dashed water in his face. I also summoned the ambulance, and as soon as it arrived we sent Gordon to jail.”

Never was there a more sanguinary battle than the one fought on the second floor of Lucie Smith’s house. Gordon had little difficulty getting into the room, as the fact that there are no broken locks indicates that the entry was left unlatched. As soon as Gordon gained ingress a desperate duel evidently began. Brown had a 38-caliber revolver, which was found empty after the tragedy. Gordon must have had two pistols, as six bullets pierced Brown’s body and three that of Mrs. Gordon. The bed on which Brown and Mrs. Gordon lay was covered with blood, showing that one or both had been shot while in that position, or in the struggle one or more of the wounded had fallen there.

Gordon himself was covered with blood, most of which doubtless was the result of contact with his wounded antagonist. What part, if any, Mrs. Gordon took in the encounter, her husband only is in a position to say. Two bullets are embedded in the door, several went through a window which faced to the north, three are buried in the wall and two in the ceiling. The walls are smeared with blood. The dingy carpet on the floor is saturated with gore and the furniture was badly broken in the fray.

Brown's body presented a horrible appearance, being covered with blood. There was no clothing on the body except a pair of knit drawers and a pair of socks. The undershirt had been removed and the wounds were plainly visible. There were three gunshot wounds in the breast, one of them being over the region of the heart. There were two wounds in the head, one being in the center of the forehead, and there was another in the center of the stomach and another in the right arm. The features were distorted.

Mrs. Gordon's body was found on the cellar door, face downward, clothed only in a chemise and a skirt. She had been in her stocking feet. Her hair was loose and was hanging about her head in a tangled mass. Her bosom was covered with blood and her skirt was bespattered with it. Her hands were tightly clenched and her face was smeared with plotches [sic].

At the inquest tonight the coroner's jury rendered a verdict of justifiable homicide. Gordon's case will be tried tomorrow. Governor Brown, accompanied by the secretary of state, arrived from Frankfort at 5:50 and is stopping at the Galt house. The governor is completely prostrated by the sad affair. Young Brown's body will be taken to Henderson tomorrow for burial. The remains of Mrs. Gordon are at Wyatt's undertaking establishment on Seventh street, and young Brown's body is at King's undertaking establishment on Jefferson street. Mrs. Gordon was Miss Nellie Bush of this city, and her family is one of the best known and most prominent in this state. Her mother was once state librarian at Frankfort and her grandfather was Judge Zachariah Wheat, chief justice of the court of appeals of Kentucky and one of the most learned and distinguished of Kentucky jurists. Gordon was at one time assistant manager of the Palmer house at Chicago.


Sacramento Record-Union (CA) ~ May 1, 1895

TRAGEDY IN KENTUCKY.

Fulton Gordon Kills His Wife and Her Paramour.

ALL THE PARTIES PROMINENT PEOPLE OF THE STATE.

The Murdered Man Archie Brown, Son and Private Secretary of Governor Brown, Shot No Less Than Six Times. While Three Bullets Pierced the Body of Gordon’s Wife— A Wife’s Duplicity the Cause of the Terrible Crime.

Special to the Record-Union.

Louisville (Ky.). April 30. — At separate undertaking establishments in this city lie the bodies of perhaps two of the most prominent people in the state of Kentucky. One, that of Archie Brown, son and Private Secretary to Kentucky’s Chief Executive; the other, that of Mrs. Fulton Gordon, prominent because of her remarkable beauty and excellent family connections. The story is a sad one, and has caused one of the greatest sensations this city or state has been called upon to chronicle.

A GRIEF-STRICKEN FATHER.

The rest of the Sacramento story very closely mirrors the stories appearing in the Fort Worth Gazette and Omaha Bee on the same day, with a few minor discrepancies. Following the main story, this shorter piece is appended.

Frankfort (Ky.), April 30, — The news of the tragic death of Arch. Dixon Brown, son and Private Secretary of the Governor, reached Frankfort shortly after 1 o’clock. A telegram from Dr. Young Brown, Jr., carried the sad intelligence to Governor Brown, who was at the time sitting in his office conversing with the Secretary of State and Commissioner of Agriculture. He was completely overcome when apprised of the sad fate of his son, to whom he was as devoted as it was possible for a father to be. The Governor’s grief was uncontrollable, and he gave way to the most piteous lamentations. Governor Brown and Secretary Headly left at 3 o’clock for Louisville.


Saint Paul Daily Globe (MN) ~ May 1, 1895

PACE THAT KILLS.

Louisville the Scene of One of the Year’s Most Sensational Tragedies.

TWO LIVES PAY FORFEIT.

Son of Kentucky’s Governor and Mrs. Fulton Gordon Shot to Death

BY LATTER’S IRATE HUBBY.

The Pair Were Caught in Deshabille in a Scarlet House.

Frankfort, Ky., April 30.—Mrs. Brown, mother of Archie Brown, accompanied by her two daughters, left for Louisville tonight to join the governor. On the train were other relatives of both families.

[The story is the same as reported previously. Not copied... —SG]


Salt Lake Herald (UT) ~ May 1, 1895

CAUGHT BY THE HUSBAND.

Wife and Paramour Meet for the Last Time.

BOTH ARE SHOT TO DEATH.

Never Was There a Battle More Sanguinary.

Fulton Gordon, of Louisville, Ky., Finds His Wife in an Assignation House in Company with Archie Gordon [sic], the Son of the Governor of the State—The Appointment Was Made by Telegraph by the Woman—The Story a Sad One.

[The story is the same as reported previously. Not copied... —SG]


San Francisco Call (CA) ~ May 1, 1895

THEIR GUILT FATAL.

An Injured Husband Wipes Out Dishonor With Blood.

WIFE AND LOVER SLAIN.

Sensational Killing of the Son of Kentucky’s Governor and a Frail Woman.

BETRAYED BY A TELEGRAM.

Followed to Their Place of Meeting the Couple Are Surprised and Shot to Death.

[The story is the same as reported previously. Not copied... —SG]


Hazel Green Herald (KY) ~ May 2, 1895

A private letter received here Wednesday evening stated that Arch Brown, son of Gov. Brown, and Mrs. Fulton Gordon, were both shot and killed in a Louisville assignation house by Mrs. Gordon’s husband. Arch Brown and his wife were just divorced last week.


New York Sun (NY) ~ May 2, 1895

FULTON GORDON OUT ON BAIL.

The Slayer of His Wife and Gov. Brown’s Son Released from Custody.

Louisville, May 1. — Fulton Gordon in all probability will be acquitted at his examining trial, which is fixed for next Saturday. He was released on a bond of $6,000 this afternoon, and Secretary of State Headly, a close personal friend of Gov. Brown, says he does not believe the family has any intention of prosecuting Gordon, believing that he acted as any other man would under the circumstances when he killed Archer Brown [sic] and Mrs. Gordon yesterday.

Gordon has been suffering from extreme nervous prostration all day. He had several fainting spells.

He was able to make a statement to his lawyers, which they will give out tomorrow afternoon. They now say that Brown fired the first shot. When the case was brought up in the Police Court this morning, pro tem Judge Smith was on the bench. He refused to fix the examining trial or to hear a motion for bail until after Brown’s funeral at Henderson tomorrow. The regular Judge, R. H. Thompson, was appealed to, and entered an order allowing bail.


Saint Paul Globe (MN) ~ May 2, 1895

GORDON OUT ON BAIL.

Funeral of One of the Louisville Victims Held.

Louisville, Ky., May 1. — Yesterday’s tragedy continues the all-absorbing topic. Brown’s remains were taken to Henderson, Ky., Brown’s old home, at 7:30 o’clock this morning. The governor, his wife, two daughters and John Young Brown, accompanied the body. The funeral will take place at 10 o’clock Thursday morning. Mrs. Gordon was buried in Cave Hill cemetery at 11 o’clock this morning.

Fulton Gordon was presented in court this morning for trial. His attorneys demanded an immediate trial, which was refused. They then asked for bail, but Judge Smith said it was not a bailable case, and he refused to allow the same. The case was then set for trial Saturday next, at 9 o’clock. Judge Thompson later fixed the amount of bail at $3,000.


Salt Lake Herald (UT) ~ May 2, 1895

Fulton Gordon, who killed his wife and her paramour, Archie Brown, in Louisville, Tuesday, will have a hearing on Saturday. Mrs. Gordon was buried yesterday.


Hartford Republican (KY) ~ May 3, 1895

AVENGED.

The Governor’s Son Killed by Fulton Gordon.

Mrs. Gordon Killed with Brown’s Pistol.

ALL ARE PROMINENT PEOPLE.

Tuesday’s Post has the following to say regarding the Gordon-Brown tragedy which occurred in Louisville Tuesday.

Fulton Gordon killed Arch Brown and then shot and killed his wife, Nellie Bush Gordon, in a house of ill-fame, kept by a low negro, on Madison street, in this city at noon today.

Gordon had known of an intimacy existing between his wife and young Brown, son of the Governor of Kentucky, and yesterday he applied to the police to place watch over his wife. But they failed to do so, and he took the matter in his own hands, and as a result the horrible double murder occurred.

Gordon kept a watch on his wife and saw her meet with Brown, and followed them to the bagnio [?] kept by the negro. They had been coming to the place every Saturday for five weeks. Last Saturday they failed to show up, but came today instead. They arrived at 11 o’clock, on foot, and went at once to a room in the second story [sic] of the house. After they had been there a few minutes they ordered some beer. At 11:30 o’clock Gordon reached the house and engaged two rooms, paying for them, saying that he wished them for himself and a friend who would come later. He was shown into a front room downstairs, right beneath the one which his wife was occupying with her paramour.

Then Gordon slipped upstairs and pushed open the door which had been locked by Brown and Mrs. Gordon. As he did so Brown sprang from the bed, having no clothing but his underdrawers. Without a word Gordon began firing. Brown had his pistol lying near and seized it and returned the fire. Gordon soon emptied his revolver, and then sprang on Brown and clutched his pistol. A scuffle then ensued for the [possession] of the weapon. In the scuffle every piece of furniture in the room was turned over and blood from Brown’s wounds bespattered the walls and floor. Gordon got the weapon and fired one shot into Brown’s body, and Brown sank to the floor dead.

Just then, Mrs. Gordon, who had been watching the conflict, sprang at her husband in a terrible fury. The latter turned and fired one shot at her just as she grappled with him. The bullet hit her just over the heart. Mrs. Gordon turned and ran. Just as she reached the head of the stairs Gordon fired at her again and hit her on the right side of the body. Gordon then ran to the head of the stairs, and snapped the pistol again, but all the loads had been discharged.

Just then Officers Reilly and Lapeille came up and arrested him. He said: “I caught them in the act, and shot them both.”

Gordon was at once taken back to the scene of the killing, and placed on a lounge in the hall. He was covered with blood and seemed to be injured, but was revived and said he was simply in a faint.

Brown was found lying in the southwest corner of the room, where he was shot, right beneath the window. A chair was standing by him, and the body was lying doubled up with the head between the wall and the dresser, which stood in the corner.


Hickman Courier (KY) ~ May 3, 1895

Mrs. Fulton Gordon and her paramour, Archibald Brown, son of Governor Brown, were killed by the woman’s husband in Louisville Tuesday.


Hopkinsville Kentuckian (KY) ~ May 3, 1895

BOTH SLAIN.

Son of Gov. Brown and Mrs. Fulton Gordon Killed.

SHOT BY GORDON IN AN ASSIGNATION HOUSE.

Details of the Bloody and Sensational Affair at Louisville.

BROWN’S BODY BURIED AT HENDERSON.

Tuesday afternoon about 12:30 o’clock Fulton Gordon shot and killed his wife and Arch Dixon Brown. The tragedy occurred at the disreputable resort of Lucy Smith, a colored woman, at 1025 West Madison street, Louisville.

Arch Dixon Brown was the eldest son of the Governor of the State, and was employed at Frankfort as his father’s private secretary.

Mrs. Gordon was Miss Nellie Bush before her marriage. Her mother, Mrs. Nannie Bush, was for many years State Librarian. Mr. Sam Stone Bush, of Louisville, was Mrs. Gordon’s brother, and Mrs. George Berry, of Frankfort, her sister.

Fulton Gordon was some years clerk at the Galt House, and later manager of the Kenyon Hotel at Frankfort. He is now manager of the Merchants’ Advice.

Gordon left the house immediately after the tragedy, but was arrested and taken to jail, where he became completely prostrated from excitement and nervous strain.

An inquest was held by the Coroner late Tuesday afternoon, and after hearing the evidence the jury brought in a verdict of justifiable homicide.

STORY OF THE TRAGEDY

Brown and Mrs. Gordon arrived at Lucy Smith’s house, 1025 West Madison street, just after the clock had struck 11. Mattie Mattingly, colored, was in charge, as Lucy Smith, the proprietress of the house, was away.

The Mattingly woman says she was well acquainted with the pair, for they had been to the house every Saturday for the past five weeks, with the exception of last Saturday.

Half an hour later, or at 11:35 o’clock, a man who proved to be Gordon, rang the door bell. “I answered the bell myself,” said Mattie Mattingly. “The man says:

‘I want to engage two rooms. I have a friend who will be here directly.’ Gordon at once paid for his room.

“I took him into the front room, the parlor, on the first floor, west side,” said the Mattingly woman. “He opened the door leading into the back parlor and said that his friend would take that room. He then took off his coat, hat and shoes and sat down on a chair near the door. He seemed nervous. Before I could go out he walked to all the doors leading from both the front and back parlors and bolted them. I did not think this strange, for most of the people who come here do that.

The account of the terrible struggle in the room is given from the combined statements of Gordon himself, Mattie Mattingly and the house boy, Geo. Wallace.

The door leading to the room from the little hall at the top of the steps was not locked. Gordon had only to turn the knob and push the door wide open. As Gordon opened the door he drew his revolver, a 32-caliber of Hopkins & Allen pattern. The couple sprang up to sitting positions in bed; as Gordon fired point blank at Brown, the latter rolled toward the far side of the bed. He rolled out of the bed and tumbled down into a narrow space between the bed and the front wall of the house. The first bullet passed into the muscle of his left arm, crushing the bone, a point of which protruded from the flesh. He hardly struck the floor before he was on his feet again, and made a dash for his revolver, which lay beside his cuffs on the dresser in the fartherest [sic] southwest corner.

As soon as his head showed above the bed again Gordon continued firing and at the same time rapidly advancing toward Brown. As he ran toward the dresser, Gordon grabbed a pitcher with his left hand. With his right he emptied the remaining four shots in the revolver into Brown’s body.

In the meantime Brown had recovered his pistol, and turning upon his assailant, he began firing. He only fired two shots at Gordon, for the latter was close upon him. He tossed his empty pistol upon the floor, and with his disengaged hand grabbed Brown’s right hand which held the other smoking pistol and at the same time dealt Brown a terrific blow over the head with the beer pitcher, smashing the piece of china into small bits.

As the blow fell upon Brown’s head he loosed his grip on his pistol and Gordon had jerked it out of his hand in a second.

Then with Brown’s own pistol, Gordon aimed at his breast, and fired. The ball passed into Brown’s heart, and he sank into the corner by the dresser dead.

Mrs. Gordon sprang at her husband’s back just as he gave Brown the shot which finished him. With tooth and nail and small fists she fought madly.

Then Gordon turned upon his wife. Two charges were yet in Brown’s pistol, which he held in his hand. He threw his wife from him and fired at her bared breast. The ball entered just above the left nipple, and she fell over against the door leading to the stair way. The blood spurted from the wound and was smeared on the inner side of the door. Though she received a mortal wound, the woman succeeded in getting the door open and stumbled out and started down the steps running. Gordon ran to the door and fired another shot at the woman between the rails of the bannister.

The bullet did not strike the woman. She ran on down the steps and across the narrow hall and into the front parlors. She rushed to the door leading to the back parlor, finding it bolted, as it had been left by her husband. Though a bullet had passed from a thirty-eight caliber Smith & Wesson revolver through her breast, and entirely through her body, she was able to unbolt the door, open it and run on through the dining room and kitchen. As she ran out the kitchen door and started toward the rear yard she dropped to her knees on a little wooden porch at the side of the kitchen. She tried to rise, but threw her hands out in front of her and fell at full length dead.

Coroner Hood was summoned. He found the woman lying on the porch at the side of the kitchen, where she had first fallen.
Coroner Hood found Archie Brown’s body just as it had fallen in the room upstairs. It was in a stooping position, almost without any clothing. The head rested against the side of the dresser.

There were seven wounds in Brown’s body. One was two inches above the right nipple. Another was four inches below the right nipple. Another to the left and near the bottom of the breast bone. One bullet passed through the fleshy part of the left arm, another through the upper portion of the right arm and near the shoulder. This bullet broke the bone, part of which protruded through the flesh. Another bullet entered the right thigh. The top of the ear was clipped off also.

There were two wounds in the woman’s body, but these were made by one bullet. The bullet entered near the left nipple, passed through the cartilage of the fourth rib, through the right ventricle of the heart, on through the right lung, and came out of the body under the right arm. In the pocket of Arch Brown was found the following telegram, which probably brought about the fatal interview:

Louisville, Apr. 28.—Arch D. Brown, Governor’s Private Secretary, Frankfort: Don’t write again. Come Tuesday morning. Meet me at S’s at 10:30. (Signed) “P.M.”

It is presumed that this telegram was sent Sunday, and was that which brought about the fatal meeting. How Gordon became acquainted with the plans of the couple is yet a mystery.

WHO THEY WERE.

Miss Nellie Bush married Fulton Gordon when she was but 16 years of age. It was an elopement, and was a surprise to all who knew the young people. Miss Bush’s parents objected strongly to the marriage, on the ground, it is said, that Miss Bush was too young.

The wedding occurred in Jeffersonville Apr. 16, 1887. Some time after Gordon went to Frankfort to manage the Kenyon Hotel.
From the first Mrs. Gordon shone as a society belle. While her husband had the management of the hotel, however, Mrs. Gordon set the tongues of the gossip to wagging.

During the session of the constitutional convention Mrs. Gordon was much admired by several men of prominence, and it was generally understood that on more than one occasion blood came near being spilled on her account.

Later Gordon went to Chicago and worked at the Palmer House three years. Last November he and his wife returned to Louisville. He has one child a little girl.

Arch Dixon Brown was the eldest son of Gov. John Young Brown and Rebecca Dixon Brown, the eldest daughter of Governor and United States Senator Archibald Dixon. His grandfather Dixon, for whom he was named, was one of the most distinguished men of his day, having succeeded Henry Clay to the United States Senate. He was born in Henderson, April 23, 1864, and received his early education at private schools in Henderson. When he finished the course there he was sent to Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, where he graduated with honors. On his return to Henderson he studied law for a time, but never practiced.

In 1888 he married Miss Virginia Marshall, a very beautiful young woman of Henderson, and to them was born about five years ago a daughter. One year ago, on account of incompatibility of temper, it was agreed that a divorce should be granted to the wife. Suit was instituted at Henderson, but the petition was declined by Judge Givens. Mrs. Brown then moved to Louisville and sued in Judge Field’s court and a divorce was granted her about two weeks ago.

On Arch Brown’s return from college he held a position in the revenue service four years and then was city editor of the Daily Gleaner, of Henderson, which place he held until his father’s election as Governor. In this position he displayed considerable ability as a writer. Leaving the paper he was appointed by his father as his private secretary and had since lived at Frankfort.

THE BODIES BURIED.

The body of Mrs. Gordon was buried at Cave Hill cemetery Wednesday, from her late home.

Arch Brown’s remains were taken to Henderson, accompanied by his brother Jack and other friends, Wednesday. The Governor and his family followed and the interment took place at 10 o’clock yesterday.

Gordon was admitted to bail Wednesday afternoon in the sum of $3,000 in each case.


Kentucky New Era (KY) ~ May 3, 1895

FULTON GORDON.

Fulton Gordon’s attorneys furnished the Courier-Journal of yesterday with their client’s statement to them regarding the tragedy of Tuesday. First of all, he says that he never for an instant suspected Arch Brown of being intimate with his wife, and that when he went to that house Tuesday morning he expected to find another man with her, one of two or three prominent business men of Louisville, who were reported to him as being on terms of criminal intimacy with her. He says he did not go there with the intention of killing anyone, but simply to satisfy himself as to whether the reports about his wife were true. He said that he wanted to face her and let her know that he knew of her conduct so that he might sue for a divorce and the custody of their child, and also to find out who the man was so as to make him co-respondent in the divorce suit if his wife should attempt to fight the case. He says that after he got to the house and heard his wife and the man with her talking he lost control of himself and in spite of himself dashed upstairs and knocked at the door. He says that Brown opened the door and struck him in the face, and then he threw himself against the door and forced himself into the room. He and his antagonist clinched and fought all over the room. That they fell on the bed and that he beat Brown over the head with his pistol until he succeeded in releasing himself and that he then stepped back and fired, breaking Brown’s arm, Brown having first shot at him. That Brown then seized a water pitcher and attempted to strike him with it, and that when he threw his arm up to ward off the blow the pitcher was broken by coming in contact with the pistol in hand; he then fired once or twice more at Brown, striking him each time, and that by that time Brown had gotten his pistol and fired twice more at him Gordon, finding his pistol empty, clinched with Brown and in the scuffle he got Brown’s pistol from him and shot him—that shot was the fatal one and Brown fell with his head behind a dressing case. At that moment Gordon says he was attacked by his wife, and he turned and shot her just above the heart. She turned and started down the steps, and he followed her to the head of the stairs and fired at her again, but missed her, and she, after being shot through the heart, passed through two rooms, unlocked the back door, and then fell dead on the back porch.

Gordon says that he then put on his shoes and coat and passing out the back door by his wife’s dead body started up to surrender to the officers, when he was arrested and carried back to the scene of the killing, where he fainted when he looked out into the back yard and saw the almost naked body of his wife where she had fallen.

He swears that he did not know who he had killed until he was taken back there and heard the officers talking about Brown. He said that when he entered that room upstairs he and the man clutched and fought so desperately that he did not think as to who his antagonist was, and that when the man fell dead he fell back with his head behind the dressing case in such a position that his face could not be seen. He said that he supposed he had killed one of the two or three prominent business men whose names appeared in the anonymous letter that he received last week in regard to his wife’s conduct. He says: “I never even suspected Brown of such a thing and was surprised when I found out that it was he I had killed.”

Gordon says that he got his clue to the meeting with his wife and Brown from seeing in her hand last Sunday morning a slip of paper on which she had written “Tuesday.” She, it is thought, kept that as a memorandum to keep her from forgetting the engagement. It was on Sunday that she sent the telegram to Brown.

Brown had been warned of his danger, but the woman had such an influence over him that try as he might he could not keep away from her. Mr. Herndon, a travelling man who lived in Louisville, went all the way to Frankfort to prevail upon Brown to stay away from Mrs. Gordon. He told Brown that Gordon had been notified in some way of his wife’s conduct, and that he knew Gordon well enough to know that he would kill any man whom he might catch in a compromising position with her. In view of these facts he begged his friend Brown to stay away, and the fact that Brown did not meet her Saturday as had been his custom would indicate that he had determined to give the woman up, but the meeting of Tuesday went to show that his will was too weak when she ordered him to come to Louisville on Tuesday.

The way in which he learned of his wife’s unfaithfulness was this: Every few days a letter came in his care to Parolee Mitchell, who was a negro servant at his house. He would give his wife the letters for the girl. One day his wife asked him if he did not have a letter in his pocket for the girl, and when he replied in the negative his wife betrayed so much solicitude as to arouse his suspicion, and when the next letter came he opened it and found it to be a love letter to his wife, but it was not signed. The wife had simply been using the servant’s name for a blind.

Last Sunday morning Mrs. Gordon asked her husband to go to church with her. Just as they were about to start, Mrs. Gordon, on the pretense of wanting a handkerchief, returned to her room. While there she wrote on a piece of note paper, but immediately tore it up and threw the fragments into a magazine. Gordon afterwards took the bits of paper and arranged them so that he was able to read the following, which had been written by his wife:

“Don’t write until you hear from me. I haven’t received a line from you and my suspicions are aroused. I will telegraph.”

This note pasted on a sheet of paper is now in the possession of Gordon’s counsel, together with the letter which had been addressed to the servant girl.

Mrs. Gordon, after she had torn up the note, wrote another. Gordon caught a glimpse of it in some way and recognized the word “Tuesday.” Convinced by this time that his wife was unfaithful, he believed that on the day mentioned she intended holding a guilty tryst with the man who had been writing letters to her.

The same day Gordon mentioned his suspicions to a personal friend, whose name is not divulged, and asked his assistance. The friend agreed to aid him.

When Arch Brown met Mrs. Gordon on Fourth avenue last Tuesday, Gordon’s friend saw them. He followed them to West and Madison and then went to Tenth and Green, where he telephoned to Gordon’s office or to another point where the latter had agreed to wait. The import of the message was that the guilty pair had been treed.

Gordon met his friend at Tenth and Green and the two went to West and Madison, where the house, to which the woman and Brown had gone, was pointed out. Before Gordon left his friend to enter the house he promised that he would do nothing rash and it is said insisted that he was wholly unarmed. The only reason he wanted to go into the place, he said, was to verify his suspicions and show his wife that he was cognizant of her unfaithfulness. The friend walked away as soon as Gordon entered the house. What followed has been detailed.

The telegram which was found in Arch Brown’s coat pocket after the tragedy, it will be remembered, was dated Monday, and fits into the groove of the torn up note exactly. It was signed “P.M.,” the initials of Parolee Mitchell, the servant girl.

The telegram is as follows:

“Louisville, April 28—Arch D. Brown, Governor’s Private Secretary, Frankfort: Don’t write again. Come Tuesday morning. Meet me at S’s at 10:30. P.M.”


Saint Paul Daily Globe (MN) ~ May 3, 1895

ECHO OF BROWN TRAGEDY.

No Special Effort Will Be Made to Prosecute Gordon.

Louisville, Ky., May 2. — An intimate friend of the Bush family, Mrs. Gordon’s relatives, is authority for the statement that so far as they are concerned, nothing would be done toward pushing prosecution against Fulton Gordon. They are anxious for the whole unfortunate affair to be hushed up, and will allow the matter to be dropped. A special from Henderson says Gov. Brown’s mother-in-law [sic] stated today that the governor would do nothing towards prosecuting Gordon, but would simply let matters take their course. The governor and his wife return to Frankfort tomorrow. It is thought Gordon’s plea will be self-defense as to the killing of Brown, and that he will testify that Brown fired the first shot. His defense for killing his wife will in all probability be temporary insanity.

[The next story is almost word-for-word the same, with one important difference: The Saint Paul paper referred to the Governor’s “mother in law.” It should have been “brother in law” as below. —SG]


Salt Lake Herald (UT) ~ May 3, 1895

LOUISVILLE’S HORROR.

Everybody Anxious That It Should Be Forgotten.

Louisville, Ky., May 2. — An intimate friend of the Bush family, Mrs. Gordon’s relatives, is authority for the statement that so far as they are concerned, nothing would be done toward pushing prosecution against Fulton Gordon. They are anxious for the whole unfortunate affair to be hushed up, and will allow the matter to be dropped.

A special from Henderson says Gov. Brown’s brother-in-law stated today that the governor would do nothing towards prosecuting Gordon, but would simply let matters take their course. The governor and his wife return to Frankfort tomorrow. It is thought Gordon’s plea will be self-defense as to the killing of Brown, and that he will testify that Brown fired the first shot.

His defense for killing his wife will in all probability be temporary insanity.


Stanford Semi-Weekly Interior Journal (KY) ~ May 3, 1895

The most sensational tragedy that has occurred in Kentucky for many a day was enacted at a colored assignation house in Louisville Tuesday afternoon, when Fulton Gordon shot to death Archibald D. Brown, son of Gov. Brown, and his own wife whom he had shadowed and caught in flagrante delictu. He broke into the room and commenced to shoot at Brown, who returned the fire as soon as he could, but his wounds, four in number, soon weakened him and he fell dead at the feet of the wronged husband. The false wife attempted to flee, but Gordon shot at her just as she reached the bottom of the steps and she too fell dead. Gordon was immediately arrested and placed in jail. Brown, who was his father’s private secretary, has always been more or less dissipated, and since his marriage six years ago, he has gone from bad to worse till his wife had to secure a divorce from him, the decree having been granted less than two weeks ago. Mrs. Gordon was highly connected, being a grand-daughter of Chief Justice Wheat, and the daughter of Mrs. Bush, who was State librarian. She was an exceedingly handsome woman, and to her beauty was indeed a fatal gift. She was fond of admiration and delighted in the society of fast men. Her elopement and marriage to Gordon was a great surprise as he was a poor hotel clerk. For awhile they lived happily together, but it wasn’t her nature to be true to one man and many scandals were connected with her name. They finally came to the ears of Gordon and they separated, he going to Chicago to clerk in the Palmer House. About a year ago they were reconciled, and since then they have lived in the pretty Louisville suburb, Kenwood. It wasn’t long, however, before the woman began her conquests again, but Gordon seemed ignorant of her doings until recently, when his eyes were opened and the result of his investigations followed in the horrible double tragedy. The governor is said to be completely prostrated over the blow and much sympathy is felt for him. To be consistent, however, he will have to pardon Gordon, if convicted, for he put himself on record as a believer in the unwritten law, in pardoning Woods, who killed Mayor Higgins at Danville, for an attempted crime upon the former’s sister.


Frankfort Roundabout (KY) ~ May 4, 1895

TERRIBLE TRAGEDY.

The Governor’s Private Secretary and Mrs. Fulton Gordon Meet Death at the Hands of the Latter’s Husband.

Arch D. Brown and Mrs. Fulton Gordon were surprised in a house of ill repute on West Madison street, in Louisville, Tuesday morning, and both shot to death by the wronged and infuriated husband of the latter. Such, in brief, is the story of a terrible tragedy which has filled the columns of the daily press of the country this week, none of the hideous details being omitted. The tragedy is of peculiar interest in this city by reason of the fact that Arch. Brown was the oldest son and Private Secretary of the Governor of the State and Mr. Gordon and the wife well known here, where he was for a time manager of the Kenyon Hotel.

The terrible ending of these two erring, sinful lives has brought a sorrow to the hearts of two devoted mothers more terrible than death itself and a blight upon the lives of scores of others, for whom the most callous hearted can feel naught but the warmest sympathy. And who is there with a spark of manhood in his breast that does not pity the unfortunate man now awaiting trial for the commission of a double crime of which no jury in this broad land would convict him, and to whom existence must henceforth be but a living hell?

The awful killing has but added another dark chapter to the history of our State, already blotted and blurred with crimes of various kinds, and can only serve as a warning to the living. Having taught its lesson, the sooner covered by the [veil] of forgetfulness the better.


Richmond Planet (VA) ~ May 4, 1895

A GOVERNOR’S SON CAUGHT IN THE ACT.

IMMORALITY IN HIGH PLACES.

A Shocking Example for the Negro.

A BLOODY TRAGEDY IN KENTUCKY—THE BRECKENRIDGE SCANDAL WITH VIVID COLORING.

[Rest of story same as Omaha Bee, May 1, 1895. —SG]


Fort Worth Gazette (TX) ~ May 5, 1895

FULTON GORDON’S CASE.

Louisville, May 4. — The case of Fulton Gordon, who on last Tuesday killed his wife, Nellie Gordon, and Archie Brown, son of Governor Brown, was today postponed until next Tuesday on account of the defendant’s health, he being in a very nervous condition and unable to appear.


Saint Paul Daily Globe (MN) ~ May 5, 1895

Gordon’s Case Postponed.

Louisville, Ky., May 4.—The case of Fulton Gordon, who last Tuesday killed his wife, Nellie Gordon, and Archie Brown, son of Gov. Brown, while in a room together on Madison street in this city, was today postponed until next Tuesday on account of the defendant’s health, he being in a very nervous condition and unable to appear.

[Rest of story same as the Fort Worth Gazette May 1, 1895. —SG]


Mount Sterling Advocate (KY) ~ May 7, 1895

KILLED THEM BOTH!

Fulton Gordon Surprises His Wife and Arch Dixon Brown

In a Room Together and Slays Them Both.

FEARFUL AND BLOODY TRAGEDY

Tuesday, about noon, Fulton Gordon, of Louisville, shot and killed his wife, Mrs. Nellie Gordon, and Archibald Dixon Brown, oldest son and Private Secretary of his father, Gov. John Young Brown, in a negro dive on West Madison street, Louisville. It seems Brown and Mrs. Gordon came to the house of Lucy Smith about 11 o’clock and asked for a room. They were shown to a front room upstairs. In half an hour Gordon also came and wanted a room. He was given one just under the room that Brown and Mrs. Gordon occupied. The woman who had answered Gordon’s ring, went back to her work and very soon heard nine pistol shots. The only living witness to that awful tragedy in that upper room is the murderer Gordon. He entered the room, shot Brown as he lay on the bed; Brown sprang up but fell to the floor, then arose and made for his pistol which lay on a dresser in the far part of the room. This Brown secured, but in the meantime he had been shot by Gordon some five or six times.

Brown managed to fire at Gordon once, but Gordon, who had emptied his pistol, grappled with the wounded man, wrenched his pistol from his hand, and fired a fatal shot that instantly killed Brown. Gordon then fired upon his wife, who ran from the room and down the steps to a back porch and fell dead upon the cellar door. Brown was clad in only his underdrawers and socks and Mrs. Gordon had only only chemise and stockings. Gordon gave himself up and was committed to jail.

Brown was shot seven times and Mrs. Gordon once. Gordon was untouched, though he was utterly prostrated after the butchery. He fainted a number of times at the mere mention of the affair.

Mrs. Gordon was Miss Nellie Bush, daughter of Mrs. Cordelia Bush, who was formerly State Librarian. She married Gordon some ten years ago.


Mount Sterling Advocate (KY) ~ May 7, 1895

The examining trial of Fulton Gordon for killing of his wife and Arch Brown at Louisville is to be held today if Gordon is able to attend court. He was released on bond after his arrest, but has been so prostrated that he faints when the tragedy is mentioned in his presence.


Stanford Semi-Weekly Interior Journal (KY) ~ May 7, 1895

—Fulton Gordon was too weak to appear in court Saturday and his examining trial for the killing of Arch Brown and Mrs. Gordon was continued until today. He is almost in a state of collapse and it was reported that he was dead.

—Fulton Gordon caught on to his wife’s correspondence with Arch Brown by the anxiety which she displayed when the servant girl failed to get a letter. It was carried on through her and when Gordon opened one of the letters he found out all.

—It is said that there are two men prominent in Kentucky politics who are on the ragged edge of suspense lest their names will be brought to light in connection with Mrs. Fulton Gordon at the trial today. Should their escapades be ventilated it will be sure political death for them, and to the average office-seeker physical death is preferable. The way of the transgressor of the seventh comment is hard and many a man has been stranded on the rock, if not ground to pieces by it.


Breckenridge News (Cloverport, KY) ~ May 8, 1895

THE KILLING OF ARCH BROWN AND MRS. GORDON.

The Couple Are Discovered in a Liaison and Both Are Shot to Death.

Gordon Tells the Story of How the Tragedy Occurred.

SOME PERSONAL HISTORY OF BROWN AND GORDON.

Just as the news was going to press last week news came flashing over the wires of an awful double tragedy in Louisville. We were unable to give full particulars at the time. The following graphic account is taken from the Louisville Post printed on the evening of the day the tragedy occurred. The Post says:

Fulton Gordon killed Arch Brown and then shot and killed his wife, Nellie Bush Gordon, in a house of ill-fame, kept by a low negro, on Madison street, in this city at noon today.

Gordon had known of an intimacy existing between his wife and young Brown son of the governor of Kentucky, and yesterday he applied to the police to place a watch over his wife. But they failed to do so, and he took the matter in his own hands, and as a result the horrible double murder occurred.

Gordon kept a watch on his wife and saw her meet with Brown, and followed them to the bagnio kept by the negro. When they reached the place, they were met by Mattie Mattingly, who had been left in charge of the house, during the absence of the proprietoress, Lucy Smith. They had been coming to the place every Saturday for five weeks. Last Saturday they failed to show up, but came today instead. They arrived at 11 o’clock, on foot, and went at once to a room, in the second story [sic] of the house. After they had been there a few minutes they ordered some beer, which was taken to them by Wash Montgomery, a negro boy. After that no one saw them until their dead bodies were found.

At 11;30 o’clock Gordon reached the house. He met the Mattingly woman and engaged two rooms, paying her $1 for them, saying that he wished them for himself and a friend who would come later. He was shown into a front room downstairs, right beneath the one which his wife was occupying with her paramour.

The negro woman then left and went to the rear of the house where she was engaged in ironing. Soon after Gordon arose and bolted the door between his room and the back parlor. He then sat down on a lounge in the front hall. The negro saw him sitting there, and as the front door was open sent the negro boy around and asked him to go in a room where he would not be seen by passers by. Gordon did so and the boy left.

Then Gordon slipped up stairs and pushed open the door which had not been locked by Brown and Mrs. Gordon. As he did so Brown sprang from the bed, having on no clothing but his underdrawers. Without a word Gordon began firing. Brown had his pistol lying near and seized it and returned the fire. Gordon soon emptied his revolver, and sprang on Brown and clutched his pistol. A scuffle then ensued for the possession of the weapon. In the scuffle every piece of furniture in the room was turned over and blood from Brown’s wounds bespattered the walls and floor. Gordon got the weapon and fired one shot into Brown’s body, and then Brown sank to the floor dead.

Just then, Mrs. Gordon, who had been watching the conflict sprang at her husband in a terrible fury. The latter turned and fired one shot at her just as she grappled with him. The bullet hit her just over the heart. Mrs. Gordon turned and ran. Just as she reached the head of the stairs Gordon fired at her again and hit her on the right side of the body. Gordon then ran to the stairs and snapped the pistol again, but all the loads had been discharged.

Mrs. Gordon ran to the rear of the house and fell, expiring on the cellar door. Gordon ran from the house, and at the corner of West and Madison streets, met a buggy and started to unhitch the horse. Just then Officers Reilly and Lapeille came up and arrested him. He said: “I caught them in the act and shot them both.”

Gordon was at once taken back to the scene of the killing and placed on a lounge in the hall. He was covered with blood and seemed to be injured, but was revived and said he was simply in a faint.

Brown was found lying in the southwest corner of the room, where he was shot, right beneath the window. A chair was standing by him and the body was lying doubled up with the head between the wall and the dresser, which stood in one corner. The blood from his wounds covered him. His feet lay toward the bed which was in a mussed up condition, as if it had been but lately occupied. The body was taken to King’s undertaking establishment and five wounds were found on it. Two of the bullets went through his heart.

Mrs. Gordon was taken to Cralle’s undertaking establishment and two bullets were found in her body.

Coroner Hood was called and made arrangements to hold an inquest at Taylor’s saloon at 5:30 this evening.

THE STRUGGLE.

Only Gordon Can Tell What Occurred in the Blood-Bespattered Room.

Only Gordon can tell of the awful struggle that occurred in the front room upstairs, where Arch D. Brown was found dead, lying in a heap beside the dresser and under an open window. All over the walls were great spots of blood, and the furniture was tossed about in every direction. The terrible struggle for life was a fierce one. From all appearances Gordon must have tiptoed in his stocking feet to the room where Brown and the woman were, they unconscious of their danger, had not locked the door, and the first knowledge they had of Gordon’s presence was when he stepped into the room and confronted them as they lay upon the bed. That they were upon the bed is evidenced by the fact that the sheets are stained with blood, and Gordon’s first shot probably struck Brown in the right shoulder as he lay on the bed.

He then fired again, possibly before Brown could arise, as Mattie Mattingly says there were two shots and then a long interval. Then Brown arose from the bed, and, pistol in hand, attempted to protect his life. His first shot evidently missed Gordon, as there is a hole of a 32-caliber bullet in the door, passing from the inside to the outside. Then commenced that dreadful hand to hand struggle between the two men, crazed with passion, which ended in Gordon shooting Brown five times and then killing his wife with Brown’s pistol. Brown was shot five times, twice just above the left nipple, once in the center of the breast, once in the right shoulder and once in the right ear, the bullet penetrating his skull. He fell in a heap in a corner, just under an open window.

Then, according to the best accounts, Gordon turned Brown’s pistol, which he had wrested away from the latter during the struggle, upon his wife, who had been a silent witness to the tragedy. He shot her once, and she ran from the room. As she was leaving the room he fired the remaining load in the pistol at her and she fell. Quickly she recovered and ran down the stairs, through the back hall and into the back yard, where she fell upon the cellar door, face downwards. She was clad only in a chemise and was literally covered with blood. Some friends laid a counterpane over the form, and she lay in that condition until ordered removed by Coroner Hood.

WHAT GORDON SAYS.

He Tells the Policeman Who Arrested Him How the Tragedy Occurred.

When Gordon arrived at the jail he was in such a nervous state that it was impossible to get a statement from him. Several times on the way to the jail from the place of the murder he fainted and when he tried to get from the wagon at the jail door he was too weak to walk and had to be supported.

When placed in jail he placed his hands over his eyes and began to moan. All attempts to get him to speak about the affair were of no avail. He seemed to realize the seriousness of the situation, and except occasionally when he murmured his wife’s name nothing else could be gotten from him. His suffering was really pitiable to see, and a man was kept with him to prevent him doing himself any bodily injury.

Officer Lapeille came upon the wagon with Gordon, and to him the murderer gave an account of the affair. Several times during the recital he became so excited that he had to be held to prevent his springing from the wagon.

“I have been suspecting my wife and Brown for about a week,” he said, “and this morning laid a trap for them. I followed my wife, and when I saw that she meant to meet Brown I could not contain myself.

“When I discovered them in the room together I immediately thought to kill them. I entered the room and began firing. I fired five shots from my own pistol. When I had no more loads in my pistol I saw that Brown had drawn his weapon and he began firing upon me. He was injured in several places.

“He fired two shots, but neither hit me, and I advanced upon him, and before he could fire the third time I caught him by the wrist and in some way succeeded in wrenching the pistol from his hand. I shoved him off and at the same time fired. He fell back and I think he was killed. He did not move after the shot. I wounded him several times with my own pistol, as was shown by the blood spots, but the ball that killed him was from his own pistol.

“My wife then advanced on me. I had not fired at her before, though I meant to kill her when I entered the room. She looked frenzied, and when I pointed the pistol at her she did not flinch. I fired, and then she turned and with a cry of pain ran from the room. Just as she passed through the threshold I fired again, and then she fell. The last shot had killed her.

“As soon as I fired the final shot I left the house and started to God knows where. That [is] all there is about it.” And putting his hands before his eyes he sobbed aloud. The recital of the tragedy had weakened him so that he was unable to talk further.

THE FATAL TELEGRAM.

The Meeting Was Made by Telegraph on Sunday.

In the pockets of Arch Brown was found the following telegram, which probably brought about the fatal interview:

“Louisville, April 28. — Arch D. Brown, governor’s private secretary, Frankfort: Don’t write again. Come Tuesday morning. Meet me at C’s at 10:30. (Signed) “P.M.”

JUSTIFIABLE.

The Coroner’s Jury’s Verdict—Gordon Still Prostrated in Jail.

Louisville, April 30—At the coroner’s inquest tonight the jury brought in a verdict of justifiable homicide in both cases.

Gordon is still prostrated in jail, unconscious and in a dangerous condition. Wealthy relatives are ready and anxious to go his bond when it shall be allowed, but he cannot now be moved, even were bail allowed.

No one knows how Gordon learned of the meeting, but the belief is he got one of Brown’s letters. He had been watching his wife for several days and probably had been on guard at the house.

THE GOVERNOR AND FAMILY

Arrive in Louisville at the Galt House—Funeral at Henderson Thursday.

Louisville, April 30. — Governor Brown and Dr. John Young Brown arrived this evening and went to the Galt House. they were joined tonight by Mrs. Brown and her two daughters who came down on the Chesapeake and Ohio train.

Dr. Brown looked at the remains at the undertaker’s, but Gov. Brown’s friends persuaded him to remember his boy as he had last seen him, and he did not look at the body.

The remains will be taken to Henderson on the morning train and the funeral will take place Thursday.

The remains will be accompanied by Dr. John Young Brown, Jr., W. P. McClain and Marmaduke B. Morton. Mrs. Gordon’s body was taken tonight to her late home at Kenwood.

ARCH D. BROWN.

History of the Young [Man] Who Was Slain by Gordon.

Arch D. Brown was the eldest son and child of Gov. John Young Brown. He was thirty-two years old and was reared at the family home in Henderson. During the first Cleveland administration he was in the internal revenue service under Collector Hunter Wood and was stationed in Owensboro a few months. During this time he was married to Miss Virgie Marshall, youngest daughter of the late W. J. Marshall, of Henderson, a very beautiful girl. After he retired from the revenue service he was a reporter on the Henderson Gleaner. His marriage proved unhappy, the young couple proving of incompatible temperaments, and separated soon. Later they lived together for a year or two and a little girl was born unto them. They separated again, however, and young Brown, about a year after his father’s election, went to Frankfort to become the governor’s private secretary. He was a handsome fellow, retiring in disposition and had few intimates.

By agreement a year or two ago his wife brought suit for divorce in Henderson, but Judge Givens declined to grant the decree, deciding there was no lawful ground for divorce until they had been separated five years, Mr. Brown providing well for his wife and child, though living apart from them. At frequent intervals he would take the little girl to Frankfort for a visit, keeping her there several weeks, and seemed passionately fond of her. There was no serious trouble between him and his wife. They simply seemed not to be congenial and couldn’t get along with each other happily.

A few months ago young Mrs. Brown went to Louisville to make her home temporarily with Mr. and Mrs. Lee Suter, the latter a cousin of her husband. By agreement again Mr. Suter, who is a lawyer, filed for her another suit for divorce on the simple charge of abandonment, and the divorce was granted early in April. No habit of Arch Brown or special act of any kind prompted the divorce suit. The couple simply wanted to be freed from each other.

THE GORDONS.

A Beautiful Young Woman Whose Fast Ways Have Long Been Known.

Mrs. Gordon was Miss Nellie Bush, of Louisville, a sister of Sam Stone Bush, who was for a time manager of the Southern Magazine. She was a sister of Mrs. George Berry, of Frankfort. About ten years ago she was married to Gordon who was at the time a clerk at the Galt House. The marriage was the result of an elopement. Later Gordon became clerk of the Kenyon hotel at Frankfort and his wife lived in the hotel with him. During the constitutional convention there was much gossip about her, and there was an episode in the hotel in which she was involved which created a small sensation. Gordon was inclined to dissipation, it was believed, on account of his wife’s waywardness. Afterward he became, during the World’s Fair, a clerk at the Palmer house in Chicago. His wife repeatedly visited Louisville and Frankfort. She was a very beautiful woman, the mother of three children. Lately he has been employed as manager of the Merchants’ Advice agency, with an office in the Columbia building in Louisville.

Gordon was not considered a man of great force of character. It has long been believed that he could not be ignorant of his wife’s habits and that he would not resent them. This estimate of him seems to have been a serious mistake.


Fort Worth Gazette (TX) ~ May 8, 1895

FULTON GORDON’S TRIAL.

The Bush Family Will Take No Part in the Trial.

Louisville, May 7. — The examining trial of Fulton Gordon, who killed his wife and Archie Dixon Brown a week ago, was up today in the city court. Colonel James Andrew Scott of Frankfort was present at the request of Governor Brown, simply to hear the evidence, and not with a view to further action.

Mr. Marmaduke Bowden made a statement in behalf of the Bush family in which he declared it was their intention to take no part in the trial. The evidence produced today was in substance the same as had already been published regarding the testimony. There was a hot argument over the admission of Gordon’s statement to the officers after the killing, Gordon’s counsel claiming that he was in such a condition both mentally and physically as not to be able to make an intelligent statement. The prosecution contended that all the evidence went to show that Gordon had acted coolly and deliberately, and that his confession to the police officers should under the law of evidence be admitted.

Judge Thompson said he would take the question under consideration until tomorrow. The trial was then adjourned until 2 o’clock tomorrow afternoon.


Hartford Herald (KY) ~ May 8, 1895

HE AVENGED HIS HONOR

HORRIBLE DOUBLE MURDER IN LOUISVILLE.

Arch Brown, Son of Governor Brown, Killed by the Husband of the Woman He Had Debauched.

THE WOMAN ALSO KILLED.

Louisville Post, April 30.

Fulton Gordon killed Arch Brown and then shot and killed his wife, Nellie Bush Gordon, in a house of ill-fame, kept by a low negro on Madison street, in this city at noon today.

Gordon was employed as manager of the Merchants’ Advice Agency. He is a clever, gentlemanly fellow and apparently as inoffensive as a mouse.

Mrs. Gordon was Miss Nellie Bush, of this city. About ten years ago she was married to Gordon, who was at the time a clerk at the Galt House. The wedding was an elopement.

She was about thirty years old and leaves three children.

Arch Brown is the oldest son of the Governor of the State of Kentucky. Few young men in the State have been more prominently before the public in the past few years than he. As the private secretary to the Governor he was prominent in State politics, and during his father’s canvass he made himself known in every county.

He was born in Henderson, Ky., thirty-two years ago, and while always more or less dissipated, he was a young man who had the faculty of making and keeping friends.

About six years ago he was married to Miss Virginia Marshall, of Henderson. The marriage, however, was not a happy one, and only last week he was given a divorce on the grounds of incompatability of temperament.

Brown was the oldest child of the Governor, and was named after his grandfather, ex-Gov. Archibald Dixon.

[The rest of this story not copied in full as it is essentially the same as has been presented already in the stories above. Some new information presented is as follows. —SG]

(From Thursday’s Post)

Governor Brown will take no steps toward prosecuting Fulton Gordon for the killing of his son, Arch Dixon Brown. The Governor was seen and the statement can be made authoritatively.

The statement is further strengthened by the words of his brother-in-law, who said: “The Governor will do nothing toward prosecuting Gordon. He will simply let matters take their course. He will continue in the race for Senate.”

An intimate friend of the Bush family was called to the Bush home in Kenwood. There he met Mr. Sam Bush, a brother of Mrs. Gordon, and Mr. George Berry, who married Mrs. Gordon’s sister. The gentlemen both authorized their friend to state that the Bush family would do nothing towards pushing the prosecution of Fulton Gordon. They are anxious for the whole unfortunate affair to be hushed up as soon as possible, and as far as they are concerned, Gordon is now a free man.

Mr. Gordon is at the residence of Dr. Gavin Fulton, 211 West St. Catherine street, where he was taken when released on bail. When he arrived at the house he asked to be left alone in a room, and his wishes were complied with. It was only until late in the night that he consented to see anyone, and then he would not talk of the tragedy. He spent a very restless night, sleeping very little, but in the morning he appeared to be considerably refreshed, though still extremely weak. He could not be induced to partake of any breakfast, and seems to be in a stupor, from which he is aroused with difficulty. When he does talk, however, it is much more rationally than he did yesterday, and Mr. Dulaney thinks that by tomorrow he will be able to give his attorneys a clear statement of the killing.

Attorneys Shield and Kohn had a long talk with Fulton Gordon last evening. According to what Gordon told Kohn he never had the least suspicion of his wife until a week ago. He then began to watch her, though he hoped that his suspicions were unfounded.

Last Sunday he had his suspicions strengthened when he found a lot of bits of torn paper on the floor in his dressing room. On one of the bits he the word “suspicion.” With great difficulty he put the pieces of paper together and saw that it was a partly written telegram, which had been written by his wife and which read: “Do not write till you hear from me. My suspicions are arouse. [sic] Will telg [sic].” The last word is supposed to have meant telegraph.

By that time you can imagine Gordon’s feelings. He determined to clear his suspicions at all hazards, but that same day he saw her with the paper on which was written “Tuesday,” and it was then that he decided to set a trap for her.

Gordon loved the woman dearly and said that even to the last he hoped there had been a mistake. So certain was he that there had been a mistake that at one time he started to leave the house and only refrained from doing so to satisfy himself of what he hoped to be foolish and groundless suspicions.

Not until he heard the voices of the couple in the room above him and recognized that of his wife could he convince himself that his suspicions were correct. Then he crept to the door and listened. Gordon was not himself by this time, and the killing that followed was only the natural outcome of what could be expected.
_____

The trial of Fulton Gordon for the killing of his wife and Arch Brown was postponed from Saturday until Tuesday, and it is not likely it took place then on account of his precarious condition. It is believed that the terrible ordeal through which he has gone will rob him of his reason. When his trial does come up it is almost certain that he will be cleared.


Beaver Herald (OK Territory) ~ May 9, 1895

At Louisville, Ky., Fulton Gordon followed Dixon Brown, son of Gov. Brown, and Mrs. Gordon to a house on the 30th, and finding them in a private room together, fired at Brown, inflicting a wound from which he died in a few minutes. Just before his life ended, Brown fired one shot, which wounded Gordon, possibly fatally. Gordon then turned his weapon on his wife and shot her through the abdomen, killing her instantly. Brown had only recently been divorced from his wife.


Hazel Green Herald (KY) ~ May 9, 1895

TERRIBLE TRAGEDY.

Archie D. Brown Killed by Fulton Gordon.

AND THE WIFE OF GORDON MEETS THE SAME FATE.

An Assignation House in Louisville the Scene of the Crime.

There was a bloody shooting affair in Louisville on the morning of the 30th ult., at 1205 Madison street. Arch Brown, son of the governor of Kentucky, was shot and killed by Fulton Gordon. The wife of Gordon shared the same fate. It seems that Brown and Gordon’s wife were in the house at 1205 Madison street, and Gordon followed them there and caught them together. Gordon at once attacked Brown and shot him fatally. Gordon then turned his weapon on his wife and sent a bullet through her breast, killing her almost instantly.

The Leader correspondent was on the scene a moment after the shooting occurred, and when he arrived the woman was lying dead on the cellar door in the back yard of the place, and Brown was in one of the upstairs rooms.

A great crowd gathered around the building and the excitement was intense, as all sorts of rumors were afloat as to the killing. One woman said that she had seen the meeting, and that it was the son of the governor of Kentucky that had been killed.

Mrs. Gordon was Miss Nellie Bush, of Louisville. About ten years ago she was married to Gordon, who was at that time a clerk at the Galt house. The wedding was an elopement. Shortly afterward Gordon and his wife moved to Frankfort, where he became proprietor of the Capitol hotel. This he continued to run until the World’s Fair began, when he sold out his establishment and moved to Chicago.

Gordon was watching his wife and Brown and saw them enter the house. He waited a few moments and then rushed in, to find that they had retired together. Forcing his way into the chamber, he began firing on the guilty couple. Brown returned the fire, and nine shots were exchanged, of which Brown fired four. Gordon, as soon as Brown fell, shot his wife. Lucy Smith, colored, was the only woman in the house at the time of the shooting, except Wallace Montgomery, a little boy. When seen shortly after the shooting she seemed greatly excited, but managed to tell all she knew about the crime. She said: “It was exactly 11 o’clock when Mr. Brown and the woman came to the house. No one was in but Wallace (meaning the little boy) and myself. I told him to go to the door as I was ironing some clothes. When he returned he told me that it was Mr. Brown and a lady, and that he had shown them upstairs. Nothing more was thought of them till the shooting.

“About half an hour later there was another ringing of the door bell, and the little boy again went to the door. He soon called me and said that there was a gentleman at the door who said he wanted to rent a room. He said he was alone.

“I then went to the door and was met by Gordon. He had been at the house before. He said he was tired and wanted to lie down and go to sleep. I told him to lie down in the front room, as the man and woman were in the only available room, on the second floor. He immediately began undressing, and I left the room.

“I returned to my work in the kitchen and began talking to the little colored boy, when I was startled by nine pistol shots in rapid succession. I ran out the back alley and found an officer. With him I returned to the house to find the yard and house crowded with people.

“We were told that a woman and two men had been shot in the front room upstairs. As we neared the front part of the house I observed the body of a woman, seemingly dead on the back porch. In the hall a man half dressed, was gasping for breath. That was Gordon.

“I learned later that he had attempted to escape immediately after the shooting, but was captured by officer O’Reilly and returned to the house, where he soon relapsed into a state of unconsciousness. He was resuscitated shortly after, however, and I heard the first physician who arrived say that he was not hurt.

“Mr. Brown and Gordon have both visited this house frequently, and we know them well.

“No, I never saw the woman before, but I am positive she has been here before. The little boy always let people in when Miss Smith was out.”

From what the woman said it would seem that Gordon had some intimation of what was going on, and came to the house with the intention of killing the man and his wife. There can be no reason assigned for taking his clothes off before going upstairs.

The guilty couple were taken completely by surprise. Brown was prepared for such a visit as his pistol was lying near, but before he could reach it the enraged husband commenced firing. His aim was true, every shot taking effect, Brown’s body being riddled. Brown fired a few shots and then staggered to a chair in the corner, then fell over on the bed. Gordon then turned to his wife and fired on her, striking her in the breast. Though mortally wounded, she was able to get down the steps and run twenty feet to the cellar door.

Mrs. Gordon comes from one of the best families in Louisville. She was 30 years old and leaves three children. On account of the high family connection the murder caused a great sensation. Brown was recently divorced from his wife. When the divorce was published no woman’s name was connected with the case, but it is understood the reason for the divorce lay in Brown’s intimacy with Mrs. Gordon.

The news of the killing of young Brown created great excitement in Frankfort. He was his father’s private secretary and well known to the society of Frankfort and the state. Gordon, who did the shooting, was formerly proprietor of the Capitol hotel, and is well connected. —Lexington Leader.


Crittenden Press (Marion, KY) ~ May 9, 1895

BROWN A CANDIDATE.

He Will [Not] Prosecute the Slayer of His Son.

[Henderson Journal]

“You may say that Gov. Brown will continue in the Senatorial race,” said Secretary of State J. W. Headly last night.

“Of course he will cancel the engagement he made to speak at Russellville Monday,” Mr. Headly went on, “but his canvass will be conducted all the same. He has expressed his position fully and freely in the newspapers heretofore, and everybody knows just where he stands. It will be some time before Gov. Brown will begin any active personal canvass.”

WILL USE THE NEWSPAPERS.

“For the present,” continued the speaker, “the Governor will use the newspapers as a medium for communicating with the people. His only object in making a personal canvass anyway was to meet and shake hands with his old friends about the State, and receive personal assurance of support from them.”

Mr. Headly spoke as one having authority, but one of Gov. Brown’s close relatives was not so sure. He said he thought it very likely that the Governor would continue in the race. He would be urged to do so by those close to him, and all possible pressure will be brought to bear to prevent him from giving up the contest. The speaker thought matters had gone too far and that Gov. Brown had too good a chance to win to give up now. Many of the Executive’s friends expressed themselves in a similar manner. Bowed down with grief, as he now is, it will be hard to bring Giv. Brown’s mind to political natters. It is for this very reason that his friends will urge him to stand in the fight. It will keep him from brooding over his sorrows, and give him something to think about and look forward to.

WILL NOT PROSECUTE.

If Fulton Gordon is prosecuted neither Gov. Brown nor any of his relatives will have anything to do with it. Their wish is that the slayer of Arch Brown and his own wife be allowed to go free. The Governor himself made this statement to a near relative and close friend yesterday afternoon. Both himself and all whom he has taken into his confidence in the matter think this is the wiser course.
_____

GORDON’S TRIAL.

Court ... Arraignment of the Accused.

Wednesday morning Fulton Gordon, who killed his wife and Archie Brown, was before Judge Thompson’s court for trial. We clip the following from the Louisville Post:

The people began arriving as soon as the court room was opened, and waited patiently through the intervening time. About the bar was a throng of lawyers intent on hearing the case, and just beyond, and fairly climbing over each other in an effort to get to a point of vantage was the eager expectant throng.

Judge Thompson took his seat on the bench, bailiff Vetter called for order and the Judge said: “Gentlemen are you ready in the case of Fulton Gordon?”

At this instant almost, Gordon entered the court room, leaning on the arm of Mr. Dulaney. Except for a slight pallor and a nervous twitching of the face, he betrayed at this time no great emotion. At times he passed his hands over his face or cast his eyes to the ground.

That he was suffering a great nervous strain was evident by the continued moving of his hands and biting of his nails. But when the name of his wife was mentioned for the first time by Coroner Hood, a great change came over him. He pressed his hands to his eyes and bowed his head but only for a moment for with a mighty effort he managed to control himself.

Coroner J. C. Hood being sworn testified as follows:

I saw the bodies lying where they were said to have fallen. I made an autopsy in the case of Mrs. Gordon and an examination of wounds in the case of Brown.

There are ten bullet wounds and and two contused wounds that [are] worth mentioning. There may yet be some slight scratches besides that, but those were the principal wounds.

The contused wounds were one on top of the head, and looked like it had been made with some blunt instrument, and one at the summit of the forehead, made by a blunt instrument.

The bullet wounds were two in the left arm, through the fleshy part of the biceps muscle, one on the left side, about four inches diagonally above and to the left of the left nipple, one bullet hole about two inches above the left nipple, and one bullet wound about four inches diagonally below and to the left of the left nipple, one bullet wound in the right side about one inch below and two inches to the right of the right nipple, and one in the right arm, on the outer side of the arm, about three inches below the schronium process, of the shoulder, one in the thigh near the upper and inner extremity of the right thigh above the region of the femoral ring. I believe I have named all the wounds.

MRS. GORDON’S WOUNDS.

She had two bullet wounds: one was the wound of entrance and the other the wound of exit. The wound of entrance was on the left side about two inches to the left of the left nipple, and the wound of exit was under the right arm. the ball passed in about two inches to the left of the left nipple, passing in front of the left lung. It pierced the right ventricle of the heart and passed out through the right chest wall.

There were powder burns, abundance of powder burns about each of the wounds of entrance on the body of each, and on the body of Mrs. Gordon the chemise was burnt showing the pistol was very close.

There were no marks of any kind on the bodies; there was but one other thing I noticed on the body of Mrs. Gordon that perhaps might have something to do with circumstantial evidence—the soles of her stockings were caked with blood, showing she must have tramped around the room in the blood.

COL. SCOTT’S SCORCHER.

Col. Scott took occasion to make [one or two sentences not legible]...

The evidence, Scott contended, proved that Gordon went to the Smith house as calmly as though he were going to buy a hat, paid for the room and calmly and cooly sat down. “Like a man-hunter,” exclaimed Col. Scott, “stealing upon his victim, he stealthily crept up the stairs, after having taken off his shoes, and he stands in a listening attitude; when the cigars were brought to him he cooly lit one; it was no effort to smoke; he did that just as he would in his office.” Detailing further the conduct of the man Col. Scott, holding his hand impressively toward the court said:

“In all the history of the world did Your Honor ever hear of any crime more deliberately planned and executed. Was there anything to denote insanity?”


Saint Paul Daily Globe (MN) ~ May 9, 1895

GORDON’S TRIAL.

Confession Made to an Officer Is Declared to Be Competent Testimony.

Louisville, Ky., May 8. — The examining trial of Fulton Gordon was resumed at 2:30 o’clock today. Judge Thompson stated that he had decided to admit Gordon’s confession to Officer Lapeille, as it was entirely competent. The prosecution this afternoon caused a subpoena to be issued for Webster Gazely, who was present when court opened. It was stated that the prosecution expected to show that Gazely was the man who accompanied Gordon to Lucy Smith’s house after informing him that Brown and his wife had gone there. Gazely, however, testified that he had no knowledge of the deplorable affair, and he was excused. Officer Lapeille testified as to Gordon’s statement made in the ambulance. Gordon said he went into the room, and his first shot would have killed Brown if Mrs. Gordon had not jumped in the way. Brown, he said, had fired while he was getting out his pistol. After the first shot out of Brown’s revolver, Gordon said he grabbed him. After several shots had been fired, Brown dropped his pistol, and Gordon, picking it up, shot Brown, killing him with the bullet. Mrs. Gordon, the prisoner said, fought him like a tiger during the fight. Just as she got to the door, Gordon said he fired a second shot at his wife. He said: “You will find two bullets in her.” Gordon said Brown had struck him. From Gordon’s statements witness was led to believe that Mrs. Gordon had struck her husband with a pitcher or something else. Witness described Gordon’s nervous condition. After the hearing of further evidence, the commonwealth rested its case, and Mr. John, attorney for Gordon, moved for the discharge of the prisoner.

Judge Thompson ordered an adjournment until 11 o’clock tomorrow morning, when argument on the motion will be heard.


Salt Lake Herald (UT) ~ May 9, 1895

GORDON WAS A TOOL.

STARTLING ALLEGATION MADE IN LOUISVILLE.

It Is Said That the Killing of Arch Dixon Brown By Fulton Gordon Had a Big Conspiracy Behind It.

Louisville, Ky., May 8.—The Courier-Journal today prints the following: The sensation attending the Gordon double killing is not over yet by half. The prosecution will attempt to prove that the killing of Arch Dixon Brown was due to a deep laid plot to assassinate him; the trap, as the prosecution believes, was fostered and planned by a person who, for reasons best known to himself, was afraid to do the work and used Gordon as a tool to carry out his designs. The governor has reason to believe that his son’s coming to Louisville on the day of the tragedy and his assignation with Mrs. Gordon was known to a man in Louisville. This Louisville man, the prosecution claims, notified Gordon that his wife was to meet Brown and “actively assisted in the foul assassination.” The prosecution further says the name of the man who “acted as a spy,” is known, and he will have to be produced in court.

*The attorneys for the prosecution have taken this step upon the theory that Gazlay telephoned to Gordon and shadowed and located the couple.* [This sentence inserted from an otherwise identical story in the San Francisco Call for May 9, 1895. —SG]

In a private letter last night Governor Brown insisted that the man referred to be brought into the court on an attachment. The man who, as the prosecution believes, piloted Gordon to the house of Lucy Smith is a college chum of Gordon’s and was married in Frankfort.

Mr. James A. Scott, the Frankfort attorney employed by Governor Brown to prosecute the case, was seen last night at the Willard hotel. He is a fearless, capable lawyer and has the reputation of doing what he believes to be his duty at all hazards. He said:

“Governor Brown sent for me about 1 o’clock yesterday afternoon. He explained his views and position in the matter, and employed me to prosecute the case in the examining trial. I want to say that Governor Brown never authorized any statements that he would not prosecute the case, nor did he ever dream of granting a pardon to Gordon, as has been stated.

“Before deciding on the step Governor Brown took counsel with a number of intimate friends from all over the state. He came to the conclusion that it was due the memory of his son that there should be a full and fair investigation [of] all the facts, not necessarily for the purpose of prosecution, but for the purpose of enabling him and the officials of the law to determine whether there ought to be a further prosecution of the case. He arrived at this conclusion after satisfying himself that his son did not seduce Mrs. Gordon, and that Mr. Gordon had no reason to believe that he had led her from the path of virtue. He was convinced that Gordon must have known that his wife was dissipated, reckless and imprudent, if not an unchaste woman.

“Governor Brown is now firmly convinced that a well-planned trap was laid for his son and that his son was selected for the sacrifice out of a large number of like offenders and that information was furnished of his coming by someone in Frankfort to another in Louisville, who, for some motive, advised and actively assisted in what Governor Brown considers a foul assassination. We have good reason to believe that we know who the man is who took Gordon to Lucy Smith’s house. He was a college mate of Gordon’s and was married in Frankfort, Ky.

“This man must be brought into court. We will demand it. There will be some very interesting developments when he is brought up. He will push the matter to the bottom and bring out all the facts.

“In regard to the others who were like offenders with Arch Brown, I will say for the sake of Mrs. Gordon’s relatives, who are all excellent people, and highly esteemed by Governor Brown and his counsel, the governor would shrink from any attack upon her character, but would prefer to throw the veil of charity over all her acts, especially as she is dead. The future will determine whether it will be necessary to further blacken the character of Mrs. Gordon in order to show the defendant’s thorough knowledge of it. We do not know as yet what the defense will tyry to prove, and until we do know, I will be unable to answer that question. If necessary we will show that others were equally guilty, but I do not think we will have to do this. I think the developments will be surprising to some people.

The examining trial of Fulton Gordon was resumed at 2:30 o’clock today. Judge Thompson stated that he had decided to admit Gordon’s confession to Policeman Lapeille, as it was entirely competent.

Webster Gazlay was subpoenaed, but testified that he had no knowledge of the deplorable affair, and he was excused.

Policeman Lapeille testified as to Gordon’s statement made in the ambulance. Gordon said he went into the room, and his first shot would have killed Brown if Mrs. Gordon had not jumped in the way. Brown, he said, had fired while he was getting out his pistol. After the first shot out of Brown’s revolver, Gordon said he grabbed him. After several shots had been fired, Brown dropped his pistol, and Gordon, picking it up, shot Brown, killing him with his own bullet. Mrs. Gordon, the prisoner said, fought him like a tiger during the fight. Just as she got to the door, Gordon said, he fired a second shot at his wife. He said: “You will find two bullets in her.”

The commonwealth rested its case, and a motion for the discharge of the prisoner will be argued tomorrow morning.
_____

THE OLD STORY.

What will be called for a little while “the Louisville Tragedy”—the killing by Fulton Brown of his wife and of Arch Dixon Brown—is one of a long line of such, reaching as far back as recorded time and destined to stretch forward till time shall be no more. Similar tragedies happen upon among the “first families” of all countries, and every day among the “last families.” All the parties might have known beforehand that something like a public sentiment called on the betrayed and abandoned husband to kill; the invader of another man’s house should know what to expect; the woman died between the two men. The laws men make in cold blood seem to be suspended in the presence of laws which appear to have made themselves. So the man, who in the face of things seems a murderer, will not be treated as a murderer; the dead will be buried out of sight; and there will be other tragedies. —Kansas City Star.


San Francisco Call (CA) ~ May 9, 1895

CLAIM A CONSPIRACY.

Young Brown’s Death Is Said to Be Due to a Plot.

A TRAP SET BY A SPY.

Gordon Piloted to the Scene of Slaughter by a Meddler.

SENSATIONS ARE IN ORDER.

One Part of the Prosecutions to Blacken the Character of the Slain Woman.

[Rest of story same as Salt Lake Herald for May 9, 1895. —SG]


Hopkinsville Kentuckian (KY) ~ May 10, 1895

The Fulton Gordon Trial.

The trial of Fulton Gordon has been in progress at Louisville since Tuesday. Col. James Andrew Scott, of Frankfort, was retained by the Browns to assist in getting at the facts. A sensation was created when Col. Scott claimed in a speech that Arch Brown was the victim of a plot and was foully assassinated by those interested in getting him out of their way, who used Gordon as their tool. This, however, was not established in the trial. The argument began yesterday. After court Wednesday Gordon fainted and fell in a heap on the floor.


New York Tribune (NY) ~ May 10, 1895

FULTON GORDON DISCHARGED.

AN EXTRAORDINARY SCENE IN A KENTUCKY COURTROOM.

Louisville, Ky., May 9. — Judge Thompson, after listening to arguments for four hours in the Gordon-Brown murder case this afternoon, decided that Fulton Gordon should not be held for trial, and discharged him. Judge Thompson, after the closing argument, said:

I have listened to the case carefully, and have consulted the authorities. It is my deliberate judgment that this man is not only not guilty in law, but his action will teach adulterers that when they ply their nefarious calling they are standing upon a precipice from which they are in danger of being dashed at any moment. The prisoner is discharged.

Then followed a wild scene. People jumped upon chairs, the bar, and even on the steps of the Judge’s bench, and broke into cheers. Hundreds waved their hats in the air, and the attorneys for the defense almost had their hands wrung off by the enthusiastic multitude.


New York Times (NY) ~ May 10, 1895

FULTON GORDON NOT HELD FOR TRIAL

The Audience Cheers the Announcement by the Judge.

Louisville, May 9. — Judge Thompson, after listening to arguments for four hours in the Gordon-Brown murder case this afternoon, decided that Fulton Gordon should not be held for trial, and discharged him.

People jumped upon chairs, the bar, and even the Judge’s bench and cheered. Hundreds waved their hats in the air, and the attorneys for the defense almost had their hands wrung off by the multitude.

Judge Thompson was unable to restrain the commotion, and the court was declared adjourned.


Sacramento Record-Union (CA) ~ May 10, 1895

KILLING OF ARCHIE BROWN.

Gordon Discharged, After Being Assailed by Counsel for Prosecution.

Louisville, (Ky.), May 9. — The City Court was crowded today when the case of Fulton Gordon, charged with the murder of his wife and Archie Brown, was called.

Prosecuting Attorney Thurman endeavored to show the court that Gordon’s crime was nothing less than a deliberate murder.

Attorney Shields, for the defense, asked the dismisal of the prisoner on the grounds of justification.

Then Attorney Scott, who represented Governor Brown in the prosecution, began a vigorous arraignment of Gordon, and pictured in glowing colors the character and qualities of Archie Brown.

At the conclusion of the argument Gordon was discharged.


Salt Lake Herald (UT) ~ May 10, 1895

WILD SCENE IN COURT.

Fulton Gordon Discharged as an Object Lesson to Other Adulterers.

JUDGE IS CONGRATULATED.

BAILIFF’S ATTEMPT TO RESTORE ORDER WITHOUT SUCCESS.

In Explanation Judge Thompson Said There Was no Evidence of Guilt on Gordon’s Part, but that the Adulterer and Adulteress Merely Met the Fate They Might Have Reasonably Expected—End of a Sensational Chapter.

Louisville, Ky., May 9. — The city court was crowded today when the case of Fulton Gordon, charged with the murder of his wife and Archie Brown, was called. Prosecuting Attorney Thurman endeavored to show the court that Gordon’s crime was nothing less than deliberate murder.

Attorney Shields, for the defense, asked the dismissal of the prisoner, on the grounds of justification.

Then Mr. Scott, who represented Governor Brown in the prosecution, began a vigorous arraignment of Gordon, and pictured in glowing colors the character and qualities of Archie Brown.

After arguments were completed and the case closed, Judge Thompson announced that he could not hold the prisoner and that he would discharge him, as an object lesson to other adulterers.

Never was a crowd more demonstrative in its appreciation than was the immense throng in the police court when Judge Thompson announced in a clear tone the verdict in the case.

Cheer after cheer went up and hand after hand was thrust out to the Judge to show how much his verdict was appreciated. There was evidently not a soul in the court, save the attorneys for the prosecution and perhaps some friends of the dead man, but was pleased with the verdict.

In vain did the bailiff endeavor to restore order, but it was of no avail, and even after the vast throng reached the streets, the cheering was kept up.

In explanation, Judge Thompson said there was no evidence of guilt on Gordon’s part, but that the adulterer and adulteress stood on the verge of an abyss of ruin and death and their fate was only what could be expected. Thus ends the last chapter to the most sensational tragedy in the history of Kentucky.


San Francisco Call (CA) ~ May 10, 1895

GORDON IS CLEARED.

Not held for the Killing of His Wife and Brown.

A LESSON IN MORALITY.

Cheers Follow the Decision Rendered by Judge Thompson.

APPROVAL OF THE VERDICT.

Close of a Chapter in the Most Sensational Tragedy in Kentucky’s History.

Louisville, Ky., May 9. — The City Court was crowded today when the case of Fulton Gordon, charged with the murder of his wife and Archie Brown, was called.

Presenting Attorney Thurman endeavored to show the court that Gordon’s crime was nothing less than deliberate murder.

[Rest of story same as Salt Lake Herald for May 10, 1895. —SG]


Stanford Semi-Weekly Interior Journal (KY) ~ May 10, 1895

Though Gov. Brown had Col. Scott to assist in the prosecution of Fulton Gordon and there were promises of a big sensation involving a Frankfort man, who it was claimed gave Gordon the clew, there was nothing remarkable in the trial, except that Gordon fainted twice. The defense offered no testimony and a motion of dismissal was made an argued at 11 o’clock yesterday. The defense agreed to let Gordon be held for manslaughter, but the prosecution refused to permit it.

As we go to press a dispatch from Louisville says that Judge Thompson, after hearing the argument discharged Gordon, holding that he was justifiable, a very righteous decision, all things considered.


Mount Sterling Advocate (KY) ~ May 14, 1895

Fulton Gordon who was tried last week before Judge Thompson in Louisville for the killing of Nixon Brown [sic] and his (Gordon’s) wife, has been acquitted.


Stanford Semi-Weekly Interior Journal (KY) ~ May 14, 1895

When Judge Thompson announced his decision discharging Fulton Gordon for killing his wife and Arch Brown, an old man who had taken great interest in the examination, rushed up and throwing his arms about the judge, gave him a resounding kiss. If the judge is the kind of a man we take him to be he’d as lief be bitten by a mad dog as kissed by a man. The salary of his office is not worth such infliction.
_____

The Louisville Grand Jury is now investigating the Fulton Gordon case, but the courts had best let the matter drop. The Times truly says the case belongs to hell and should not longer be permitted to smell to heaven. Out with the damned spot.


Hartford Herald (KY) ~ May 15, 1895

—Fulton Gordon is now at Pewee Valley and it is said the country air is already having an improving effect upon his shattered nerves.

—Fulton Gordon was acquitted of the killing of his wife and Arch D. Brown in his trial before Judge Thompson at Louisville Wednesday.


Richmond Climax (KY) ~ May 15, 1895

UNWRITTEN LAW DIFFERENTLY INTERPRETED.

Fulton Gordon was released by the court on his examining trial for the murder of his wife and Archie Brown. He is now a free man, unless the Grand Jury takes a notion to give him a twist, which is hardly probable.


Crittenden Press (Marion, KY) ~ May 16, 1895

GORDON IS FREE.

Judge Thompson Finds Him Not Guilty in Law.

Louisville, Ky., May 9. — Judge Thompson, after listening to the arguments for four hours in the Gordon-Brown murder case this afternoon decided that Fulton Gordon should not be held for trial, and at 3:10 o’clock discharged him. Judge Thompson, after the closing argument, said: “I have listened to the case carefully and have consulted the authorities. It is my deliberate judgment that this man is not only not guilty in law, but his actions will teach adulterers that when they ply their nefarious calling, they are standing upon the precipice from which they are in danger of being dashed at any moment. The prisoner is discharged.”

Then followed a wild scene. People jumped upon chairs, the bar and even on the steps of the judges bench and broke into cheers. Hundreds waved their hats in the air, and the attorneys; for the defense almost had their hands wrung off by the enthusiastic multitude. Judge Thompson was unable to restrain the commotion and the court was at once declared adjourned.

The defendant was not present in court, having been excused from attendance by the prosecution. Enthusiastic friends jumped into a cab, and rapidly rode to the residence of Dr. Garvin Fulton to convey the cheerful news. Gordon was overcome with emotion.

Col. Scott, for the prosecution, said after the trial that he did not know whether the case would be taken before the Grand Jury or not. He would have to consult with Governor Brown first. He said he did not think the decision was warranted by the evidence.

The news was received at Frankfort by the public with expressions of satisfaction generally, and was not unexpected.


McCook Tribune (McCook, NE) ~ May 17, 1895

Fulton Gordon’s Act Justifiable.

Louisville, Ky., May 11. — The city court was crowded yesterday when the case of Fulton Gordon, charged with the murder of his wife and Archie Brown, was called. Prosecuting Attorney Thurman endeavored to show that Gordon’s act was deliberate murder. Attorney Shields for the defense asked the dismissal of the prisoner on the grounds of justifiable homicide. At the close of the arguments Gordon was discharged.


Richmond Climax (KY) ~ May 22, 1895

The grand jury has finally decided to investigate the killing of Arch Dixon Brown and Mrs. Gordon by her husband, Fulton Gordon, at Louisville.


Hazel Green Herald (KY) ~ May 23, 1895

The Grand Jury Will Investigate.

The grand jury at Louisville has decided to investigate the killing of Arch Dixon Brown and Mrs. Gordon by her husband, Fulton Gordon. On the morning of the 17th the jury ordered all the witnesses who figured in the case during the examination in the city court to be summoned to appear in the jury room on the 18th inst. Commonwealth Attorney Parsons attended the demands of the grand jury. The investigation of the case will be inexhaustive, but the consensus of opinion among lawyers who were about the courts was that there would hardly be an indictment. —Cincinnati Enquirer.


Sacramento Record-Union (CA) ~ May 25, 1895

Refused to Indict Gordon.

Louisville, May 24. — The Jefferson County Grand Jury has refused to indict Fulton Gordon for the double killing of his wife and Arch Brown, son of Kentucky’s Governor, whom Gordon found in a bed-room together four weeks ago.


Hopkinsville Kentuckian (KY) ~ May 28, 1895

The Louisville grand jury refused to indict Fulton Gordon for the murder of Arch D. Brown and Mrs. Gordon, Apr. 30.


Stanford Semi-Weekly Interior Journal (KY) ~ May 28, 1895

The Louisville grand jury refused to indict Fulton Gordon in either case and the deplorable tragedy will not be further aired in the courts. It is well and it would be better could it be wiped entirely out of memory, except in so far as the terrible sequel might deter other weak men and women from straying from the narrow path to suffer in the end ignominy and death.


Hopkinsville Kentuckian (KY) ~ June 14, 1895

Fulton Gordon still has fits of despondency. He has no plans for the future.


Hopkinsville Kentuckian (KY) ~ January 11, 1901

Fulton Gordon, who figured in a sensational domestic tragedy in Louisville a few years ago, has been granted a license in Cincinnati to marry Miss Blanche S. Manby of Idlewild, O.


Maysville Public Ledger (KY) ~ January 11, 1901

FULTON GORDON MARRIES.

Slew His First Wife and Her Intriguing Lover in Louisville.

Fulton Gordon, aged 40, and Miss Blanche Manby, aged 20, both of Louisville, were licensed to marry by the Cincinnati Court Wednesday.

Ordinarily a marriage license does not attract much attention, but the Ohio Valley having been shocked by a tragedy in Louisville five years ago, in which Gordon was implicated, everyone is naturally interested in his welfare.

It was he who slew a son of Governor John Young Brown, whom he found in a certain house with his own wife.

The wife was also slain, but Gordon was acquitted at the examining trial.


Stanford Semi-Weekly Interior Journal (KY) ~ January 11, 1901

Fulton Gordon, who killed his wife and Arch Dixon Brown in Louisville five years ago, was married in Cincinnati to Miss Blanch Manby, of Louisville.


Adair County News (Columbia, KY) ~ January 16, 1901

Mr. Fulton Gordon, who figured in a domestic tragedy in the city of Louisville a few years ago, killing his wife and Arch Brown, son of John Young Brown, was married in Cincinnati last week to Miss Blanche Manday [sic], of Idlewild, O. The mother of Gordon’s first wife was a native of Columbia, a daughter of Judge Monroe, who was a lawyer of wide reputation.